Saturday, 18 February 2012

♥Flutterby♥ - anagram of butterfly

Red Admiral butterfly enjoying nectar from the Vebena Bonariensis in our garden.
Dreaming in the garden, the fragrant scent of summer flowers drifting on the breeze, the warm sun gentle caressing your face, you observe butterflies flitting around the borders. Do not take them for granted, there is so much more to a butterfly than you could ever imagine.
Joining with ♥woolf♥ on her “flutterby” challenge. Visit her to see more “flapping”, “fluttering” and “flitting” of butterfly wings.
A Peacock butterfly
Wing detail
Magnified part of wing
Scales close up
close up of single scale
Microstructure of a scale
LOOK closely, never, ever, assume that what you see at first is the whole story.

40 comments:

  1. ...and you captured the theme wonderfuly Rosemary!
    and I will, I do. Look closer i mean : )

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    1. Thanks Demie, and I love your butterfly drawing.

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  2. wauw!

    beautiful butterflies
    and beautiful images of the wings up close
    nice, nice!

    P.S.
    I will be the host next week
    please stop by on Monday!

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    1. Dear Patrice - the close up of a butterflies wings are rather wonderful, pleased you liked the post.

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  3. You gave a good advise. How beautiful these details of the butterfly are.
    Have a lovely weekend
    Marijke

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    1. Thank you Marijke - this is a world previously hidden from us before the advance of technology, and I agree the structure of the butterfly wings is beautiful.
      Enjoy your weekend too.

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  4. How wonderful and interesting! The structure of the wings is just incredible!

    We get lots of red admirals, in Italy! Last Summer I followed one all over the garden and managed to take some good close ups! I love butterflies and also reptiles. Beautiful creatures!

    Nothing more fascinating that watching lizards basking in the sun. Lizards are truly beautiful: their skin shines and changes colour according to mood and back ground. I can watch them for ages...

    I'm smelling the sea and the dry grass, as I write, and feeling the hot sun on my skin!

    Flying to Italy on the 27th, but just for a couple of weeks, before the long Summer break. Can't wait to smell almond, cherry and apple blossom!

    HAPPY WEEKEND!

    ANNA
    x

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    1. Dear Anna - thank you for your lovely comment. I can just imagine you in your Italian garden following the butterflies, smelling the sea and dry grass and feeling the sun.
      Have a lovely time in Italy.
      Ciao and happy weekend to you too.

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  5. Magnificent photos Rosemary.
    I love the way that you have scaled down each wing.. its tuly amazing.
    I certainly will take time to look more interest, when the Red Admirals arrive in my garden.
    I am envious of your verbena.. mine is very green, but no flowers yet.
    Happy weekend ..
    val

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    1. Dear Val - do not be envious of the verbena - mine is green too. That photo was taken last summer. Alas, I cannot claim credit for the scaled down butterfly wings as they are via wikipedia
      Enjoy your weekend too.

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  6. Oh, that makes me feel better Rosemary, the verbena... in fact i was out watering it earlier before i saw your blog.. and thought, I hope it gives more blooms than last year. I have thrown some of the flower seeds around next to the plants..
    As for the butterfly.. well.. ok.. but you had the idea and it came out fantastic.. great blog.
    val

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    1. Thanks for visiting again. I really love verbena, and you have done the right thing by scattering the seeds around. The more the better with verbena. Actually, scattered amongst a mixed flower bed their flowers always remind me of butterflies.

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  7. What beautiful butterflies!
    Love the close-up on the wings- brought me back to my childhood being fascinated by close up picture of nature...:-)...xx

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    1. Hello Hagar - thanks for your visit, and pleased that the images took you back to your childhood.

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  8. Wow...pure gorgeousness..viusually captivating..i truly enjoyed this journey as it unfolded...marvelous art and gorgeous photos..very cool!!
    Victoria

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    1. Dear Victoria - thank you, I am delighted that you enjoyed seeing the butterfly wings. They really are one of natures beautiful creations - their complexity and colour is extraordinary.

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  9. Hello, Rosemary - Your image is my introduction to the Peacock Butterfly, who certainly lives up to its name!

    Your drilling down to the microphotography reminds me of a great Charles Eames movie, and also the relationship between micro and macro — I like that the scales on the butterfly wings are themselves little butterfly wings!

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    1. Thanks for that introduction to the Powers of Ten Mark - I have never seen it before - it is absolutely mind blowing.
      Yes, I thought it was lovely the way the scales were like feathers and wings themselves.
      Along with the Red Admiral, the Peacock is the most common butterfly in our garden.

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  10. It's a shame how sometimes the small things pass by us unnoticed. Thanks to you, we get the chance to give this gorgeous butterfly the attention it deserves.

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    1. Dear Rosemary - Sorry for the delay in responding to your lovely comment. I have just found it - for some strange reason Blogger sent it to the suspect spam box!!! Blogger is a law unto itself.
      I am sure the same thing can be said for flowers too. There is so much micro detail in them that we miss out on.

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  11. Hello Rosemary,
    really amazing pictures! Wonderful details...

    Best,
    Ariane.

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    1. Dear Ariane - thank you for your visit and your kind comments. I am pleased that you enjoyed seeing the exquisite details in the butterfly wings.

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  12. Amazing, wonderful and beautiful images:)

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    1. Hello Leena - your kind comments are really appreciated, and thank you for your visit.

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  13. The magnification is amazing and beautiful.

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    1. Dear Olive - I agree, the natural world is amazing and beautiful.

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  14. brilliant. so intriguing, the macro side of life.
    repetitive and gorgeous.
    and inpiring...
    n♥

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    1. Dear Nadine - thank you, I am pleased you enjoyed this post, photos are more my thing than drawing - it was an interesting challenge so thanks again.

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  15. hello rosemary, i am deeply impressed by your post, the close ups are pure magic. julia

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    1. Hello Julia - You have got this lovely sunny morning off to an even better start with your very kind comment. Thank you for stopping by.

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  16. Amazing! i never saw a butterflies' wing that close, and as you say yes there are always like new worlds hiding in worlds, magical. x

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    1. Hello Renilde - thanks for visiting - Indeed you are right the truth about the butterfly wings is one example of how we are gradually discovering more about the hidden world.

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  17. Well, what a wonderful analogy. It is the second time today that I have met this message: I shall remember the beautiful pictures as I meet those I work with during the day tomorrow. I think I need to ditch a few assumptions :-) Thanks Rosemary- fabulous post.

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    1. Dear Kate - thank you and pleased you liked the post. If you find the pictures useful to reflect on tomorrow, then that is doubly good.

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  18. amazing photos. inspiring post!

    and thank you for your words in my blog,
    tatjana

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    1. Dear Tatjana - thank you for your visit. The photos are rather amazing as they reveal a world all but hidden to us without the use of the latest technology.

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  19. I love your take on the Butterfly theme! I will remember your words, never take things at face value. Well it was not what you said, but I agree, if you look more closely, you will almost ever see a different picture. I am sorry I did not come round to your Butterfly post before now, I have troubles with my back, and have not spent much time with my laptop the last week.

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    1. Dear Lise - I am sorry to learn that you have been having trouble with your back, and hope that you are now on the mend.
      I am pleased that you liked the butterfly post, it is interesting to see everyone different take on the challenge. Thank you and take care.

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  20. Please could I use your butterfly images in a PowerPoint about diffraction?
    Thanks,
    David

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    1. Dear David - as far as I am concerned you can use them - there is a wikipedia credit link on the post.

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