Saturday, 15 September 2012

The Innkeeper

This is a photograph of the Abinger Arms, Surrey taken in 1890.  The Inn belonged to our Grandchildren's Great Great Great Grandfather whose picture is below. The timber-framed parts and the massive chimney date from the sixteenth century, when it was a large house known as Perrotts, standing in ten acres of land.
What a jolly looking character he seems. I think that he must have enjoyed a large jar of ale on a regular basis judging by his portly size and the pot he is holding. How lovely it would be to own the vessel now, I wonder what happened to it? May be it was broken and thrown away or possibly it resides to this day in someone's home?
In 1894 the Abinger Arms was enlarged and a new frontage and entrance added on the eastern side. The new part of the building was done in typically Victorian style whilst the rear retained its Tudor origins.
The Innkeeper's wife
This husband and wife were H's Great Grandparents on his father's maternal side.
via wikipedia
You can see the Abinger Arms today just beyond the village clock. 
courtesy wikipedia
Underneath the clock is the figure of Jack the Blacksmith, who strikes the hours with his hammer.
This beautiful Surrey farmhouse was lived in by H's Great Grandfather on his father's paternal side. Called Hatch Farm it is a splendid Tudor building built on the site of an older manor house, known as Harms Hatch. It is situated in Gomshall, the neighbouring village to Abinger Hammer. The name hatch indicates the existence of a gate across the road at the parish boundary.
Painting of Hatch Farm, Gomshall, done by Edward Wilkins Waite (1854-1924), landscape painter, who lived for a time at Abinger Hammer. He was born in Surrey and much of his work depicted rural scenes in the county.
H's paternal ancestry in this area of Surrey can be traced back to the time of King Richard I, known as Richard the Lionheart (1157 - 1199), when he granted the family a charter to mill on the river Mole. 

34 comments:

  1. How great it is to have phtographs from past relatives... The building of Abinger Arms is such a beauty and although it has certainly changed it is wonderful to see it is still there.
    I remember a picture fo a great grand father sitting next to a little wooden table. My mother had his picture frammed and that very table under it with some flowers on. I always though that great grand father really liked that...
    Impressive to be able to trace ancestor so far back : )






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    1. Dear Demie - I wonder if you still have that photo of your great grandfather? I do hope so.
      H is fortunate that he can trace is origins so far back. He has a very unusual surname which is a help. If you have a name like Smith or Brown then it is an impossible task.

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  2. Both structures are lovely. The ale pot really resembles the Great Great Grandfather.

    Those were old ballerina shoe lasts in my post. I have just gotten back online today Rosemary.

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    1. Dear Olive - I had not noticed that but you are right - the ale pot does have a resemblance to him.
      I thoughts that the lasts look dainty and that is the reason why - thank you for letting me know.

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  3. How fantastic these places are still there. I love the photo of the smiling man he has a twinkeling in his eyes. Also it is great to know where your husband's came from.
    Have a wonderful weekend Rosemary.

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    1. Thanks Marijke - it is true he does have a twinkle in his eye, and I expect that as an Innkeeper that was quite a good attribute to have.
      We are fortunate that we do know so much about H's family history, and we keep finding out more because my eldest son has done lots of research.

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  4. I love the photos! WHo would have thought those buildings have a history as rich as that :)

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    1. Thank you Lea - I did wonder whether I should post this or not, as the photos are poor quality, but if you enjoyed learning the history of the buildings then that is very pleasing.

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  5. Great family with so much history !Your H must very proud for his heritage of !
    So you ! The pics are wonderful as always . I liked the painting with colours of autumn! .
    Olympia

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    1. Dear Olympia - we are fortunate that we still retain a little of our family history, and also that there are still some old family photos.
      It is nice to see the painting of the house that H's ancestors lived in many years ago.

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  6. The building of Abinger Arms is such a beauty! Ιτ is wonderful to see it is still there.Wonderful shots!Have a great Sunday!
    Dimi..

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    1. Dear Dimi it is good that the building still lives on even though it has changed a lot over the many years. It is also interesting that it is still an inn, and quite a popular one I believe too.

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  7. What a fascinating history Rosemary. The Inn keeper looks like a barrel of laughs. I wonder if his wonderful Philpot is metal as opposed to the usual glazed Toby jug.
    The most wonderful part of this story for me is that this very afternoon I was a stones throw from the Abinger Arms and had I known I may have popped in to sample the Innkeeper's finest ale.

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    1. He certainly looks as if he enjoyed his beer - You guess is as good as mine re: the jug, but I think it is glazed pottery, and H thinks it looks like metal because it is so shiny.
      What a shame I did not post this yesterday, and then you could have reported back on the ambience of the Abinger Arms.

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  8. What an interesting posting. Isn't it amazing that our children and grandchildren can look today at photographic images that represent their lineage that far back (in terms of multiple "greats")! Hatch Farm is beautiful!

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    1. We are fortunate in having so many family photographs. I was given a large album of family photos by H's aunt because she thought that we would care for them. Our eldest son has engaged in lots of family research to put them into context.

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  9. You are so lucky to have such well preserved photos of your family and their homes. Someone must have placed a high value on them to have had them taken, and cared for, over the years.

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    1. We have acquired copies of quite a few of the photos from local historical societies in the Surrey area, and also own many that have been passed down through the family. It is interesting to be able to reflect on past lives within the family.

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  10. Thank you Rosemary. My father and his best friend went on Sunday walks organised by the Railways and one of them must have included Abinger Hammer. He always brought back watercress from there and I remember going with him once. It is a magical place. Thank you again.

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    1. That is a really interesting memory Susan from your time living in England. You are right about the watercress from Abinger Hammer. H remembers the watercress beds from when he was a boy visiting relatives. I am sure you would recognise Abinger, as it has hardly changed.

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  11. Hello Rosemary, How wonderful to have these bits of family history, added to the fact that these buildings are still visitable and attractive. I once tried to see the house where my grandparents used to live in Cleveland, a farmhouse that had been enveloped by the city, but now that area is not even safe during the daytime. Sussex looks incredible lovely, and the whole place looks like it could feature in an E.F. Benson novel. Is Hatch Farm still in good condition today?
    --Road to Parnassus

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    1. Dear Jim - E.M Forster lived in Abinger Hammer for 20 years and wrote several of his books there. Hatch Farm is still a lovely home and our eldest son visited the current owners to talk to them a couple of years ago. Forster used H's family surname (an unusual name) for a character in one of his books.

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  12. It must be so great to know/find out so much about your(MrH's) ancestors. And those pictures of what they looked like, I would just keep looking at them, what did they wear, what hairdo did they have,...wonderful! I'm just thinking, it must be very special to own pictures like that. It probably wasn't the most common thing to have your picture taken in those times, not digital camera time yet then, we just click away now but then it probably was something really special to have your picture taken. That jar must have been typical for Mr H's ancestor and something he treasured or it wouldn't be in the picture, don't you think? I do wonder what might have happened to it.
    Beautiful post Rosemary,
    Bye,
    Marian

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    1. Dear Marian - you can see that he was a great jolly character and obviously enjoyed being an innkeeper. I expect it is a job that requires someone who is convivial. H's paternal grandmother was the daughter of this couple and he remembers her well. She left him a small legacy which helped towards his university expenses.

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  13. Hello Rosemary!

    I've enjoyed this post very much. I have been researching the history of my family for several years and it's wonderful to have old photos. and to be able to photograph
    old buildings associated with family.
    I'm so pleased you have become a friend on my blog. I will join you too. Amazing how I have met so many lovely folk from many parts of the world through this wonderful medium.
    Hope you enjoy the transition from autumn to winter. It is hard to imagine that you are approaching winter as we contemplate summer!
    Betty

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    1. It was quite exhilarating to see spring emerging on your blog as we head off to the autumn. Not much golden colour on the trees yet, but a week or two will see the change.

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  14. Dear Rosemary,
    What a wonderful historical post about the Abinger Arms and Mr.H's great grandparents.
    Amazing how he still has photos of them. His great grandfather looked a very happy jolly man with his toby,and his wife looking very elegant in the garb of the times.
    They must have met many very interesting people.
    Have you been in the arms to see how it is today?
    H's grandmother mother must have had lots to tell him too.
    Love the painting of Hatch farm.
    enjoyable post.
    wishing you a happy Sunday
    val


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    1. Dear Val - he does look extremely jolly - not sure whether he is naturally that way or whether he has just enjoyed a pint or two or may be three!!!
      We have not been the Abinger Arms, but perhaps when we are next down that way we should.

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  15. Oh, Rosemary, you have brought back such memories: we used to drive past the Abinger Arms on the way to out holidays to Kent, long before the M25. We would stop and picnic on the green on the other side of the road from the pub and wait for the clock to chime. Magical post, Thank you!

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    1. That is lovely to think of you having been there Kate - this land is steeped in H's paternal roots.

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  16. What a super post - I do love family history and not just my own. Everyone has a cast of interesting characters in their past and finding out about them makes one feel, more intensely, a part of history.

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    1. I think that we are fortunate in this country that it is possible to discover so much about our families and fairly easily too. You are right is does make your feel more connected with history and the past. I think that we have mentioned before that we do share several interests in common with one another.

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  17. I am a Dorking girl born and bred, so know this area. What a small world it is.:)

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    1. That is interesting - I do not know why, but originally I had thought that you were from America!!!

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