Monday, 27 May 2013

Flower quiz answer

Five lovely bloggers got it correct - in the order that they arrived.........
Celia Hart at purple podded peas 

38 comments:

  1. congrats to the winners.
    its a beautiful flower.
    val

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You did very well Val - congrats to you.

      Delete
  2. Bummer I missed the quiz because I actually know this one ;) We have quite a few Horse Chestnuts near my family home in Virginia.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Did you like to play 'conkers' as a little boy?

      Delete
    2. Don't remember playing conkers. But I'll check with mom this weekend when I visit! Gosh, it's been so long...

      Delete
    3. I have a feeling playing conkers is a British thing. You harden the seed or nut off, then drill a hole through it which you pass a string through. Knotting the string at the bottom, boys then try to hit each others conkers until one of the smashes.

      Delete
  3. No, I would never have guessed it ! I even have a whole street nearby filled with flowering Aesculus x carnea , but didn't make the connection :(

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sometime when things are taken out of their context they are not so recognisable.

      Delete
  4. That wasn't an easy one. I think everyone has seen the flowers from afar since they're so high in the tree. How on earth did you photograph them from so closeby? I'm imagining you standing on a ladder, camera at hand, a true circus artist, photographing these flowers for us.
    Congratulations to all the clever people who got it right.
    Marian

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I was surprised so many people got it right. This tree is in our garden and some of the flower spikes are quite low down. It was a bit windy when I took the photo so I did get on a small 'two-step' ladder, you are right. Your comment made me smile - thanks.

      Delete
  5. I am glad to hear the answer. Knew I'd seen them somewhere!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. When the flowers are taken out of context it is much more difficult to recognise them.

      Delete
  6. Well, of course!! I looked and I looked - and then I came back and looked again. It niggled at me something awful. We have a horse chestnut right out front!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I expect that you were thinking along the lines of a flower from the border not a flower on a tree.

      Delete
  7. I have this tree in my garden, I must look into my garden for the answer. Sometimes it is so easy.
    Congratulations for the winners!

    Have a nice day,
    Inge, my choice

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dear Inge - thank you for giving it a go - close up the flower spikes are really very interesting.

      Delete
  8. Of course!
    I metaphorically slap my forehead with the palm of my hand.
    I was sure I had seen these flowers somewhere. Conker trees are all over the place here - I see them everyday.
    A very clever quiz, Rosemary!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I knew you would metaphorically, of course, slap your forehead with the palm of your hand when you knew the answer.

      Delete
  9. Hi Rosemary--I was fooled by the close-up into thinking that these were large, single flowers, although I should have known better. Looking for an exotic answer, I never considered the familiar!

    When we were little, we used to collect the nuts, although they are not edible. Unfortunately, real chestnut trees are long gone from Ohio, at least mature ones that bear nuts.
    --Road to Parnassus, an old Buckeye

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dear Jim - I didn't realise that you were a 'Buckeye' - we call the 'nuts' conkers. You didn't string them when you were a young 'Buckeye' and play the game of conkers like the boys here do?

      Delete
  10. Fancy that! A Horse Chestnut - didn't recognize it by the flower only.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I didn't know whether or not they grew in Tasmania so that is interesting to know.

      Delete
  11. Horse chestnut trees have such beautiful blooms. Beautiful!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. A row of white and then red blossoming Horse Chestnut trees makes a lovely show.

      Delete
  12. I could never find it Rosemary, there are no chestnuts here and I have never observed them in the mountains.But I assure you, I'll never forget it from now!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dear Olympia - you could not be expected to recognise something that you have never seen - I wasn't sure which countries they grew in - Greece is probably too hot and dry for them, they prefer a more temperate climate.

      Delete
  13. Always love your round pictures, very unique.

    Greetings,
    Filip

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Filip and Kristel - are you having a wonderful trip?

      Delete
  14. Actually... I'll be modest: "Well donet to me! You are not that useless, after all!" That's me talking to myself...
    WOW! I'm just glad I got the answer to one of your quizzes! You know, my High Scholl, in Italy, was located in a Corso (Avenue) and all the trees were "Ippocastano" Horse chestnut! At the time, I didn't know that the nuts could be of any use, then... I learnt all about "conkers!" You see? Everything has a use. I wonder if horses eat horse chestnuts?

    CIAO!

    ANNA

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Very well done Anna - I am really pleased that you got it right. I do not know where the "horse" bit comes from, but conkers are poisonous so horses wouldn't eat them. Playing conkers is the only use for them, but I think that may be a British thing only.
      I read on wikipedia that if horses do eat them they can cause tremors and lack of coordination, but apparently deer are able to break down the toxins and eat them safely.

      Delete
  15. Dear Rosemary - Thanks for today's lesson; I never knew where the Ohio nickname came from!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dear Mark - the internet is a great learning tool.

      Delete
  16. Wheeeeeeeeeeee! *Waves imaginary flag*
    I did some scouting and found the neighbouring Red Chestnut to also have the same colour morph, you learn something new everyday. Thanks Rosemary:).

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Glad you had a eureka moment Paul and I bet it is something you will never forget - the internet is a great learning tool.

      Delete
  17. I simply adore the white towers the blossoms build on the chestnut tree, thanks for the tip about the diff name in the States! happy rest of the new week!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The flower spikes remind me of candles rather like a christmas tree, but in the early summer.

      Delete
  18. Hi Rosemary! I'm surprised your quiz proved tricky.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think perhaps people are not quite so well acquainted with their flowers as you are.
      I will come up with another one at some stage.

      Delete

❖PLEASE NOTE❖ Comments made by those who hide their identity will be deleted

“You can't stay in your corner of the forest waiting for others to come to you - you have to go to them sometimes”
― A.A. Milne, Winnie-the-Pooh