Thursday, 26 June 2014

Voodoo Lily

Dracunulus vulgaris was awaiting our return - past his best but huge, measuring 51cms (20 inches long)
Thank you for all the lovely comments left on the previous post, I have read and enjoyed them all, one of them made me laugh - Parnassus it was you.
Arriving back home we were greeted by these wonderful Cirrus clouds (delicate cloud streaks). They are the highest of all clouds and are composed entirely of ice crystals. Cirrus clouds are precipitating clouds, although the ice crystals evaporate high above the earth's surface. The crystals, caught in 100 - 150 mph winds create wisps of cloud - info from web.

Whist I sort myself out I hope that you enjoy these photos of wildflowers growing in France - I do admire their municipal gardeners who use road islands and small plots of land to scatter wild flower seeds which create a colourful show for everyone to enjoy.

44 comments:

  1. Hello Rosemary,

    Well, better 'Voodoo Lily' than 'Stink Lily' as a title for this most dramatic of garden plants. The Dracunculus does make an impact in the garden in both terms of colour and form and never fails to elicit a comment! However, the smell (scent would not be accurate) can be rather off putting if one gets too close. Yours does look to be a prize specimen!

    So pleased that you are back and looking forward to all your adventurous tales!

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    1. Hello Jane and Lance - for some reason the lilies scent, lets not be too delicate about it - the smell of rotting meat, was not very strong - perhaps because it was past its best.
      Thank you for your kind welcome back.

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  2. How beautiful wildflowers! Thank you for the cloud information. That was interesting. I've never seen a lily like that.. 20 inches!!?? Happy Thursday, Rosemary!

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    1. Dear Satu - the lily is not to most people's taste, but I find it a fascinating plant and love to watch it growing bigger and bigger during the spring. It is about 15 years old and has survived in our garden over some cold winters.

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  3. Hmm - not sure what to make of your Dracunulus Vulgaris - it's certainly impressive. Loved the wildflowers. We're experimenting with one of those mixed all in one packages that you just scatter, water and see what happens. Great pictures.

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    1. I hope that scattering wild flower seeds results in the same colourful display for you that I saw in France. They appeared to have a really good mix of different varieties growing. Hopefully you will show yours when they bloom.

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  4. These wildflower patches are wonderful and the photos you made of the Cirrus clouds.......the information is so interesting, the idea that these delicate cloud streaks are entirely composed of ice crystals.
    As I said already in your former post the Dracuncula vulgaris is a very special plant, but not near my backdoor, haha, too stinky.

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    1. I was really interested to discover that the delicate cloud streaks were entirely composed of ice crystals too, and so was my husband - it is something that neither of us had realised before.
      Yes, you are right, keep Mr. Dracunulus well away from the back door, or for that matter the front door too.

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  5. Wow, that lily is amazing, so big!!! The wildflowers are very pretty, what a lovely thing to do. It was interesting to read about the clouds, I didn't know about the ice crystals in this sort of cloud! Glad that you had a good time away! xx

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    1. Lovely to hear from you Amy - glad that you enjoyed seeing the wild flowers, and you are correct my lily is big, in fact he is a whopper.

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  6. Welcome back Rosemary.
    That lily is called a stink lily down here..
    The flowers in France are very pretty, must be a delight to see in reality..
    Regards,
    Margaret

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    1. Dear Margaret - I do believe that it is quite common in some countries, but here it is rather exotic as long as you have it growing away from the house.

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  7. Welcome home, Rosemary; The Voodoo lily looks quite alarming, but is an interesting specimen to have in your garden. What a pretty confection of French wildflowers, quite blissful. We are off to France, soonish (passed all my medicals :) I didn't know Cirrus clouds were made of ice crystals either - we learn so much from your blog.

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    1. Thank you for your welcome home Patricia - most people do not like the lily, but I enjoy watching it develop during the months, and to me it is exotic.
      So delighted that you have passed all the tests, well done, your forthcoming trip will have an added appreciation for you.

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  8. How beautiful wildflowers! The wildflowers are very pretty, what a lovely thing to do.
    inspiring-garden

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    1. Thank you for your visit Laura - glad that you enjoyed seeing the wildflowers.

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  9. Wonderful. Slightly puzzled why they don't do that in England. (scatter seeds)

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    1. We should do - they make a lovely display.
      My DiL mentioned that she has seen the municipal gardeners planting up the parks etc with rolls of flowers rather like laying carpets. I wonder if they do the same with the wildflowers to get such a wonderful show.

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  10. Hello Rosemary
    I don't know this lily but I am attracted to unusual plants and will buy this if ever I see it offered for sale. We have wildflowers along Interstate highways and that surely breaks up the boredom when driving for long stretches. This year I bought some strips another commenter mentioned and it's coming along; will be seeing cosmos blooms very soon.

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    1. That is interesting Sanda - it was me who mentioned the strips as I had not heard about them before - sounds as if it is a piece of cake now to add colour to the borders.
      Be warned the lily does smell for the first 2 - 3 days when it first opens attracting flies to pollinate it, and the smell is like rotting meat!!!

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  11. Welcome back Rosemary. I recognized most of the wildflowers. So many of them are growing (but not yet blooming) in my flower patch. I have noticed that in some areas of Europe that the flower beds are becoming more relaxed and less park like. Much more interesting and beautiful. And, no doubt it will help the bee population.

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    1. Thank you for your kind welcome Gina - your flowers will soon be with you and ours will be over. In France I loved the way that they had scattered such a huge variety of flower seeds giving lots of colour. It reminded me of a pretty Liberty fabric print.

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  12. Welcome home! Wow, I'd travel to France just to see those gorgeous wildflowers. I really enjoyed visiting Monet's gardens and home last time I was in France.

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    1. The wildflowers spread municipally were very pretty - I would gladly return to Monet's beautiful garden and home - may be next time.

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  13. Hi Rosemary, hope you had a great time in Paris, look forward to hearing all about it. Wildflower meadows as good as these are not always as easy as they look. What a superb show.

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    1. Doesn't the meadow have a lovely mixture of flowers in it? - I could happily have my whole garden covered in these pretty colours.

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  14. Hi, Rosemary,

    As I recall, your Dracunulus vulgaris is situated far enough from the house so that you don't smell it. Just the same, it is spectacular in its own way. What a great idea to sow wild flowers by the roadsides. We need such breaks from all the concrete.

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    1. The French do make their public areas very pretty - I also love the way that they lollipop their trees along the boulevards in all the little towns.
      Yes, you are right Mark, Dracunulus is not near the house, but the smell appeared to over when we returned.

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  15. It certainly is spectacular.... that voodoo lily ! I, too, love the wild flower displays on roadsides in France, and have taken a number of similar photos this year. I keep getting Mark to park up in the most unlikely places, just to nip out of the car and capture the images, knowing that as soon as the heat arrives ( and it has now) the splendour will fade fast.

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    1. Dear Janice - the heat!!! - it was becoming too much for us especially during the night. However, we have returned to very hot weather here too, but fortunately we just managed to save our hanging baskets and planters from drying out completely.

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  16. Dear Rosemary,
    I'm just back from a big party-weekend in Hildesheim. Your photos of wild flowers are so lovely! They strew it in some towns and cities here too - and sometimes unlawful with 'guerilla-gardening seed-bombs". It is so nice to see the precious little flowers and herbs back.

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    1. Apparently they have guerilla gardeners in London too - I believe that they do it at night!

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  17. So - it is a HE! For some reason, I always think of flowers, even big, scary, smelly ones, as SHE.

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    1. Yes, most flowers are she, but my Voodoo Lily is definitely a he.

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  18. From the giant plant to the small wild flowers there's quite a contrast yet all part of the fascinating natural world.
    Sheffield has introduced wild flowers along main roads around the city and other communal areas. They looked pretty earlier in the year. I expect there's plenty to do in your garden after your break away. Looking forward to hearing more about your trip.

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    1. I think that there is a concern generally around the globe that we should protect and conserve our wild species, and why not when they look so pretty?

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  19. A real spectacular monster flower and a gorgeous sky....thanks for the information . Wildflowers are always a treat, gorgeous photos ! Wish you a happy weekend.

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    1. Thank you Jane - I must admit that I was really taken with all the different species in the wildflower meadow.

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  20. There he is, the old 'Beast of Five Valleys'. I am so glad that he was still around to say hello upon your return home Rosemary. He seems to grow bigger and bigger every year. Perhaps one year you can both do a duet from 'The little shop of horrors' and post it on youtube. Feed me Rosemary, Feed me! ;)

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    1. Beast of the Five Valleys - I like. If I knew how to do youtube then I would fulfil your desire.

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    2. Now that I would love to both see and hear. I shall compile a How to do a YouTube video post immediately! :)

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  21. A striking lily, but I prefer the gorgeous French wildflowers. What a wonderful idea.

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    1. The wildflowers were a treat Perpetua - my Voodoo lily is an ugly old thing, but I do love him.

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