Tuesday, 5 May 2015

Home & Away on May Day

In our garden - ornamental weeping cherry
 Piptanthuys nepalensis - Napal laburnham
Dicentra spectabilis - bleeding hearts
In the wild - Hyacinthoides non-scripta - English bluebells
 Cardamine pratensis - Lady's Smock
 pastoral countryside 
in Herefordshire
 Brockhampton - a 600 year old moated Herefordshire Manor House

This distinctive gatehouse was built from oak that was felled in 1542, more than a 100 years after the house was built. It was built as a display of wealth rather than for defensive purposes
 
Brockhampton was lived in continually for over 500 years


As May Day drew to its close we enjoyed a delicious ice cream made from Damsons and Sloe Gin - we always treat ourselves to one when passing through Herefordshire
Hope your day was good too♡
 'Paradise' will be the next post

60 comments:

  1. Houses of that age fascinate me and what's not to love about that gatehouse. Superb!

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    1. On first sight it encapsulates such a romantic image

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  2. That little house is so pretty.

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  3. that gatehouse!!! and all the blooms! what a perfect day for a walkabout!!!!

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    1. We wandered up and down some very steep hills

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  4. Hello Rosemary, Thank you for the flower images and a special thanks for providing the latin names. Brockhampton Gatehouse is spectacular and I can imagine the dinner parties there, served on that well used table. Herefordshire sporting her Spring wardrobe invites.
    Yes please for damsons and sloe gin ice cream.
    Helen xx

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    1. We always treat ourselves to that ice cream when passing through Herefordshire - it is the stuff of dreams

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  5. Dear Rosemary, Thank you for sharing the perfect post...beautiful flowers, beautiful scenery and beautiful architecture.

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    1. Thanks Gina - by the way I have now selected, after reading lots of reviews etc, which new camera I shall be buying.

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    2. Can't wait to find out which camera you have selected. Will you share, please.

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    3. I haven't bought it yet Gina - once I have I will email you especially if it lives up to my expectations.

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  6. I love that closeup of the bleeding hearts! One of my favourite flowers.

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    1. They are spectacular flowers, and seeing those drops of moisture in their pendulous ends brings the name to life but perhaps they should be called crying hearts.

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  7. Rosemary, your bleeding hearts are delightful. All the blooms are...our roses have just about finished.
    The house, so old, yet contains a mystery about it to me.
    Wonderful to see all.
    Regards,
    Margaret

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    1. I always think that nature excelled herself when she designed bleeding hearts and I am sure that house many interesting tales to tell Margaret if it could speak.

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  8. Your garden is beautiful. The colour at this time of year is so welcome after the grays and browns of winter. That house - what a history, and what a sense of peace the photos give. I wonder if its history was truly peaceful?

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    1. The peace that this house radiates is part of its history - just a small manor house of no particular importance in the scale of things, and lying in a very quiet remote valley.

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  9. Dear Rosemary,

    The views of the countryside are spectacular — you must look forward to those yellow patches the way other people look forward to autumn leaves. I enjoyed looking at the manor interiors so good to see that it has been preserved in its relatively original state. I wonder whether the same family lived there all that time?

    The weather here in Florida has been remarkably mild, with early morning temperatures still in the 60s. (But the afternoons climb well into the 80s.)

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    1. Dear Mark - I have a love/hate relationship with those swathes of bright yellow. They do look stunning, especially against a bright blue sky, but they are not a natural part of our traditional countryside. The plant is Oil Seed Rape and is a valuable agricultural commodity.
      Amazingly the property did belong to the same family for over 500 years until it was bequeathed to the National Trust.
      I can well imagine how hot it is in Florida - it feels decidedly chilly over here in comparison with our time in India.

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    2. I can understand your own perspective regarding the yellow swathes. It is as though Christo has been at work in your area!

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    3. I love that Mark - the fields do look as if Christo has been around trailing reams of yellow fabric. Fortunately it doesn't last for long only whilst the rape is in flower.

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  10. Love, love, love Brockhampton, have been there a number of times. My husband did a beautiful painting of it. Maybe I'll use that as a header next on my blog.

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    1. That would be lovely if you were to show Brockhampton on your blog header - we seem to visit the same places - may be we shall bump into each other some time.

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  11. Wonderful collection of gorgeous images, wouldn't want to name a favourite! ;-)
    I spotted a yellow tree peony, beautiful!
    I would not refuse to eat that ice cream.

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    1. Yes, you are right that is a yellow tree peony called Ludlowii. I have several peony trees in my garden too which I love. That ice cream is simply divine.

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  12. Lovely Herefordshire scenery and Brockhampton a beautiful place to visit.
    Your springflower pictures are just gorgeous!

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    1. Are the spring flowers better than ever this year? I think may be the blossom has enjoyed the slightly chilly weather, and the lack of wind.

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  13. Hello Rosemary, I love that look of weathered wood, and am continually amazed how strong it can continue to be, even after hundreds (or thousands) of years, when conditions are favorable.
    --Jim

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    1. Hello Jim - these old buildings are made from green oak which actually becomes hard and more like stone over the centuries. However, it is important to allow the oak to breath and not be tempted to put oil, paint, stain or varnish on to the oak, and then it will be around for hundreds, if not thousands of years.

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  14. A lovely series of photos. I have not visited Brockhampton, it looks so quaint. I will add it to my 'To Visit' list :-)

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    1. I hope that you will enjoy visiting - there are also some lovely walks through hillside woods that you can take.

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  15. All looks quite idyllic. I've been to the house - on the outside. How nice to see it inside. I particularly love your first picture, of the pink and white blossom. It looks so ... intentional, is the only word which comes to mind. As though someone has designed and made it that way,specially. And I am always struck by how extravagantly curly bluebell petals are.
    A lovely post.

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    1. Although you may not have realised it, I think that you are very astute Jenny. I certainly admit to spending time with that particular photo studying the cherry tree with a view to getting a good clump of blossom that would fill my camera screen. Thank you for your kind comments, I am pleased that you enjoyed the post.

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  16. Lovely collection of 'home again' photos - a compete contrast to those from India.


    Ms Soup

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    1. Yes, apart from the obvious things style etc. I think that it is something to do with the light

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  17. Your May looks so beautiful, soothing, and yummy, Rosemary. What is the yellow carpets in the pastoral countryside? I guess rape blossoms. I’m so attracted by the antiquity of the 600-year-old Manor House and how wonderfully it is used.

    Yoko

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    1. You are correct Yoko it is rape blossom which appears to have become an essential agricultural crop these days.
      The old Manor House is what is recognised as quintessentially English.

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  18. A perfect May Day post with examples of flowers in your garden, pastoral scenes and a picturesque manor house. It looks idyllic, especially as the sunlight creates a lovely, atmospheric quality to photos inside the house which has been interestingly presented. The ice cream flavour sounds delicious and looks tempting!

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    1. If ever you are passing through Ledbury I recommend getting one of these ice creams from the small cafe up to the alley-way to the church.
      I am pleased that you enjoyed the post, it turns out that we were fortunate to make the most of the May Day, the weather has gone decidedly downhill ever since.

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  19. Oh so beautiful Rosemary.
    500 years - it's what I love about England - it seems like it's all been there forever.... almost!
    A beautiful house and such a fun quirky gatehouse!

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    1. The gatehouse is lovely with a pretty room upstairs which is actually quite a good size. I can imagine children making it into their own secret place.

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  20. Just love these old Manor Houses and their interior , it makes my mind swirl with associations, and in this case it made me think of Turner . Recently saw the story of his life at the cinema.

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    1. I would love to see the Turner film, I will keep my eyes open. It is probably not on general release as quite a specialised film.

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  21. Such pretty views of the English countryside. And then the lovely house.Just fits pêrfectly in those surroundings. England is so pretty!

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    1. Our May Day holiday was such a lovely day and thank goodness we made the most of it as it has not been so good since.

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  22. That's a wonderful way to celebrate May Day! From the lovely plants in your garden to the wild flowers and the superb manor house! The ice-cream looks so good too! Sarah x

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    1. That ice cream is the most wonderful flavour - the wild flowers and the garden flowers seem to have a very intense colour about them this year - perhaps because it has not been too hot.

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  23. I had to catch up. the Taj photos are so pretty and it is difficult to select a favorite among these. Those Blue Bells are right at the top along with that view of the countryside. We saw fields yellow like that in Scotland when we were there in '86. Janey

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    1. The yellow is oil seed rape - and the bluebells seem to have a very intense colour this year. Glad that you enjoyed seeing the taj Mahal.

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  24. the bleeding hearts are my fav! sunny greetings from tulipland, lots of flowers+discoveries in spring going on here too :-)

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    1. Hello Jana - I didn't realise that you were back - it is good to see you again. The bleeding hearts in macro are extraordinary flowers, I think.

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  25. Aaah May Day Flowers! Beautiful! I smiled to see the (I think) Bonne Maman jelly jars on that historic table in the kitchen! Were those real chickens I spied just outside the darling gatehouse, or perhaps metal garden art? Loved your ending this post with the ice cream cone! I've noted Ledbury and ice cream shop on alley way to church in my book (!) I haven't had sloe gin for decades - and never as an ice cream flavor. That one I need to try...

    Mary in Oregon

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    1. Dear Mary - that jar stands out like a sore thumb doesn't it? I was tempted to move it!!! The chickens are just rusty wannabes, and if you do ever visit Ledbury then that ice cream is memorable. Ledbury is a lovely black and white timber framed Tudor town so a very nice place to visit anyway.

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  26. What a wonderful place. Pictures says a lot about what it would be in there myself.
    So many beautiful flowers - there is already almost summer.
    Have a happy spring
    Hugs

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    1. It does look like summer but it is still a bit chilly - bright sun and blue skies but not a lot of warmth as yet.

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  27. Beautiful panoramic pics of the countryside and your garden Rosemary. And how beautiful is that manor house inside and out - loving the gate house too it looks as though a fairy tale family lived there.

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    1. Thank you Elaine - I have only ever been to Brockhampton once before and that was many years ago - it was nothing like my memory of it, but is worth a visit if you are in Herefordshire. I can just imagine how much children would love the little room at the top of the gatehouse - it would make a great playhouse.

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  28. I am unconscionably late in commenting, Rosemary, but wanted to thank you for showing us this wonderful house. So atmospheric and beautiful.

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    1. This house must be reasonably close to you Perpetua - it is worth a visit especially during the spring

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