Saturday, 11 July 2015

On top of May Hill

May Hill - Michael Lawrence Shinn - 1965 - Cheltenham Art Gallery 
We can see May Hill from our own hilltop eerie, even though it is over 20 miles away, crowned with its distinctive clump of trees, and seen here on the far distant horizon.
Eulogised by poets, captured by painters, with extensive views down the River Severn to Bristol one way - Wales and the Malvern Hills to the other
It's a steep climb - that's H and grandson up ahead - hey boys! wait for me
We wondered where the Belted Galloway cows on our Common had gone - it looks as if the National Trust have given them a new place to stay
Almost arrived - soon we can rest on seats and enjoy our picnic
we have company
Bearing a rose! I wonder if he wants to share our lunch?
Contemplation
H did his volunteering job earlier in the week and told them he wanted to get home early and spend time with his grandson. Another volunteer said "are you off to play Leggo with him" - grandson is going into his second year at university!
It looks as if there will be a wonderful crop of bramble berries to harvest this autumn - I wanted to rescue this live butterfly from the clutches of the spider, but was told that I should not interfere with nature by the other two - if you look closely you can see the spider's black eye and mouth
it's harder walking down than up

52 comments:

  1. What wonderful photos of May Hill - and the panoramic views. We often drive through Herefordshire, and see it in the distance, but never have time to stop and explore. We are hoping to relocate to Herefordshire (downsizing) when we finally get a buyer, so one of these days . . .

    P.S. I would have rescued the butterfly, on the grounds that I was there to help it, so THAT was it's fate, and not to be the spider's lunch., Such is my logic.

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    1. It is interesting just how far away May Hill can be seen from all points on the compass. It is said that in medieval times May Hill was used as a navigation aid to guide boats sailing up the River Severn.
      On wildlife programmes they always say you should not interfere with nature - may be it is our female instinct that kicks in - protect and nourish. If I had been alone the butterfly would still be flying.

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  2. What a lovely walk with your grandson! Beautiful views and such a cute hairy friend offering a rose to you!

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    1. I wonder where he found the rose! Perhaps he remembers me from previously when he lived on our Common!

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  3. So great to spend time with your grandson who must be about the same age as our oldest son who just ended his second year at uni and is going to study in Bern for one semester next year. I remember I always loved to spend time with my grandmother and had to stop by and visit her often, still do whenever I can, in a few months she'll be 100 years old.

    Such beautiful scenery! Must be wonderful to have this so near where you live. Thanks for taking us all on your walk.

    Marian

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    1. We love having our grandchildren and spending time with them Marian and love the fact that they are happy to come and stay with us. We are just about to take him down to the train station for his journey home

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  4. I've been enjoying your recent posts, Rosemary. The trees on the hill are so atmospheric with the herd of cows grazing there. The views from such a high point must make this an enjoyable walk.

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    1. May Hill can be seen for miles all around - we have been intending to visit for ages but having our grandson staying was the motivation

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  5. Nice to walk up and down with you and your family the hill.That cow is he really having that rose in his mouth? Incredible, as if he is proposing to you! :)

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    1. I am having a bit of fun here Marianne♡

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  6. Dear Rosemary, That is a first for me, a belted cow. At first I thought they were very large pigs. And I love the tousled headed cow with rose...a little picmonkey foolery at work.
    Great photos again. I love the photo of the bramble berry blossoms. You captured them just right (I probably would have tried to save the butterfly).

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    1. These are dear little cattle from the lowlands of Scotland - we call them "Belties" with their white band around their middles. They do not have horns and are mild mannered.
      Yes, poor little butterfly he would be flying now if it was left up to me.

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  7. A lovely place to go for a walk! The cows look as though they were enjoying the shade of the trees! Oh and the roses of course!!! There is nothing to say that your hubby wasn't going to play lego with your grandson, it is good for all ages you know! xx

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    1. May Hill is owned by the National Trust as is our Common, that is why I think that these cows might be the ones we are familiar with on our hilltop

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  8. I prefer to picnic without cows, I don't trust them. What a beautiful place to picnic though.

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    1. These cows are known for being non aggressive and mild natured - they do not have horns and have very short legs enabling them to graze the sides of hills - they originate from the Galloway lowlands in Scotland.

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  9. Hello Rosemary,
    Those Belted Galloways look very healthy and well fed. They look like they are used to walkers and fans. The weather co-oeprated and I hope you had a great picnic.
    Helenx

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    1. Dear Helen - Belted Galloways are quite chunky little cows with short legs but several of them were more chunky than usual as they were in calf. The are amenable good natured little cows and not at all threatening - they came cosying right up to us.

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  10. I liked the painting very much indeed. Really enjoyed the excellent shots of your ramble - you had a great day for it and the views are simply wonderful. Is the clump on the top ancient? They are often old gathering places where I come from.

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    1. These particular pines appear to have been planted to celebrate Queen Victoria's Golden Jubilee but were not the first as they replaced earlier one. There is also an Isaac Taylor map dated 1777 showing a ring of trees on May Hill. Even earlier it is thought that the trees on May Hill were a landmark used by medieval man sailing up the River Severn and it is also suggested that the planting of pines was probably related to drovers who used May Hill as an overnight stop with safe grazing for their stock.

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  11. Hello Rosemary, You are lucky to have such atmospheric hills within reachable distance from your home. In Taiwan I can see various mountains in the distance, but there is no easy way for me to get to them, and so most have remained unexplored. There are some interesting parks on the mountains, including the extensive Yang Ming park, Jin Gua Shi with its historic gold mine, and museum, and a few climbable mountains with temples at their summits.
    --Jim

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    1. Hello Jim - I recall being surprised in China when we were taken to climb Laoshan in the countryside near Qingdao. We had not taken walking boots with us and imagined we were going to find it a difficult task. However, we were surprised to discover that the mountain had a footpath and steps all the way up it and then down the other side.
      It is a shame that you cannot reach the mountains in Taiwan which tantalisingly you can see - hopefully one day the opportunity to visit will arise.

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  12. Nice painting. What a lovely walk, the scenery reminds me of back home.
    Now in Katherine in the NT..

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    1. We had a lovely day Margaret - must pop over and see where your journey has reached.

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  13. A very attractive painting, of a very attractive place, Rosemary. What a delightful walk you had, with the special company of your grandson, not to mention those unusual cows. I have never known about these Belted Galloway beasts, but they do look sweet, especially when they come bearing roses!

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    1. Belted Galloway cows come from the Lowlands of Scotland Patricia - they are mild tempered beasts, do not have horns, and their short stocky legs means that they can crop the sides of the hills more easily.

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  14. That's such a beautiful place for a walk and a picnic. I loved the com pany you had for lunch and wonderful to have captured that cow with a rose in it's mouth! I always prefer walking down hills rather than up them! I know the feeling of being left behind - there is always that something that captures my eye that I want to photograph! Sarah x

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    1. I get left behind Sarah not only because I am taking photos but they also have more energy than me for climbing hills

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  15. Now I know the correct name of those cows. We always refer to them as Oreo cows. Which is a chocolate cookie with vanilla icing sandwiched between. That cow with a Rose in his mouth is halarious. As always these are beautiful shots...I enjoyed the hike.

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    1. Thanks Janey - the young children around here have a name for them too, they call them panda cows.

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  16. Pure magic Rosemary and what a beautiful scenery you're surronded by. So beautiful. And so precious time spent with your grandson. And as always, a joy to spend time here with you sweet Rosemary.

    Take care.♥

    Charlie
    xx

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    1. Dear Charlie we had a whole week with our grandson. We put him on the train back home again yesterday. It was lovely for us that he wanted to stay so long and we really enjoyed his company.

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  17. WOW, It was great to see the Belted Galloway cows in your photos today. I live here on the shores of Lake Michigan in USA - a beautiful place if I may say so myself, but I wanted to tell you that just three miles from my home we have a herd of Belted Galloway cows on a farm along the main road. What a surprise to see them on your Blog - loved it! Jack

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    1. I am interested that you have Belted Galloways in the States - 40 years ago you never saw these cows anywhere other than in their home territory of Galloway in the lowlands of Scotland, now they seem to have spread their wings all over the place. Thank you for your visit

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  18. What amazing views - no wonder people want to paint it - I love belted galloways - they are such a handsome breed aren't they. You are fitter than me - that steep climb would have done me in - but worth it for the view at the top.

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    1. I think that it was the prospect of the views that kept me going Elaine

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  19. Hello Rosemary, what vibrant and fabulous photos, and what a wonderful place for a picnic. I'm like you, always lagging behind....too busy taking photos! Love they belted galloways....such character....particularly the gardener amongst them!!

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    1. Hello Jane - it was a lovely day for walking, and we were delighted to see the Belted Galloways and have their company. They are such gentle beasts with their short stocky legs and no horns either.

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  20. What a beautiful part of Britain you live in Rosemary and what a view. Breathtakingly beautiful!

    Madelief x

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    1. It is a lovely spot Madelief with 180º panoramic views over the surrounding countryside

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  21. Dear Rosemary,

    I like that the trees at the top of May Hill have a bench and a grassy carpet; it looks like a magical place. I liked your last image especially — the thistle is the emblem of my college, Carnegie Mellon University, founded by Andrew Carnegie originally in 1905 as Carnegie Institute of Technology.

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    1. Dear Mark - I was surprised at just how luxurious the grass was beneath the pine trees, it is no wonder that the cattle were happily grazing there.
      I remember that Andrew Carnegie came from Dumfermline, Scotland so I am not surprised that the Scottish thistle was chosen as your college emblem.

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  22. You're so lucky to have this special place that's been preserved through time. What an excellent place to sit and enjoy the view.

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    1. We can see May Hill all the time across the vale whenever we are out, but this is the first time that we have actually gone up it - something we have been intending to do for ages. We shall definitely return.

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  23. Really lovely landscape. Your photos are beautiful.
    Hugs

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    1. The weather and the place was perfect for snapping photos - thank you Orvokki

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  24. What a gorgeous place. The rose baring bull/cow reminded me of Ferdinand the Bull. So funny! Your photos are lovely.

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    1. Thank you Sarah - this is another place that you could visit from Bristol at sometime in the future - pleased that you enjoyed my bit of fun♡

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  25. Please forgive the lack of comments on your previous lovely posts, Rosemary, but I have a bad leg and can only sit at the computer for short periods at present. However I couldn't resist saying how much I enjoyed this with its wonderful views of countryside I know so well - the area from the Cotswolds to Wales.

    Oh, and you're quite right about coming down being harder than going up. My knees hate it!

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  26. My toes too Perpetua - really sorry to learn about your bad leg, hope it gets better soon.

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