Friday, 13 May 2016

Daisy Time

See, the grass is full of stars, 
Fallen in their brightness;
 Hearts they have of shining gold,
Rays of shining whiteness.
Buttercups have honeyed hearts,
Bees they love the clover,
 Daisy Fairy by Cicely Mary Barker
But I love the daisies' dance
All the meadow over.


Blow, O blow, you happy winds,
Singing summer's praises,

Up the field and down the field
A-dancing with the daisies.

 by Marjorie Pickthall

44 comments:

  1. Lovely and refreshing, thanks for sharing. Greetings!

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  2. I do love daisies. They have such a simple beauty. I'm very happy that ox eye daisies have been seeding everywhere here for years and I always like to protect some of the daisies in the lawn from the mower!

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    1. I suspect that we grow up loving daisies right from the time that we first discover how to make a daisy chain.

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  3. We once visited a NT garden that had a large daisy lawn in one area, I thought it was wonderful. It amazes me how much money is spent on lawn weed killers.

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    1. I love some of the weeds in the garden and am happy for them to stay, however, others are not so welcome

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  4. In Colorado the deer eat almost every flower on sight...but not the vintage breed of daisy. They are everywhere and I sure enjoy seeing them.

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    1. It is a mystery to me which plants the deer eat in my garden, I am never to sure what is safe what is not.

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  5. Hello Rosemary, My grandmother liked daisies, and she collected that light green Limoges china with a daisy pattern, which I think people hand-painted as a hobby.

    Daisies sometime grow in massive quantities in Ohio in meadowy places, but I don't recall it being quite this early.
    --Jim

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    1. Hello Jim - I have just had a look at the Limoges china that your grandmother liked, and it is very pretty.
      The Ohio meadowy places must look wonderful when filled with daisies.

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  6. Beautiful photos and what a charming poem!

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    1. Marjorie Pickthall was born in England but moved to live in Canada when she was 7 years old. At one time she was thought to be the best Canadian poet of her generation, but subsequently has suffered a plunge in her reputation.

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  7. You always do the most amazing photos.

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    1. Thank you very kindly - may be it is all of the practise I get.

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  8. Vaude… so beautiful photos again. I love the two last ones, daisy is so lovely flower, and you did it more beauty.

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    1. The simplicity in striking yellow and white give the daisy great appeal and thank you for your kind comment.

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  9. Dearest Rosemary,
    Of all these I do love the Bellis perennis or common European daisy the most. When the meadows are filled with them it looks so pretty! It is the photo you show here, under the daisy fairy...
    Here in Georgia, USA we don't have them due to the too warm climate; MISS them so much. Fond childhood memories from The Netherlands as we did weave crowns with them.
    Hugs,
    Mariette

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    1. Dear Mariette - I like the little Bellis perennis too and sometimes wonder why some have pink tips and others are plain white? I too used to love making daisy chains, I wonder if little children still make them?

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    2. Dear Rosemary,
      The pH of the soil will affect its color. Just doubt if any of the young children will do this... Sadly so!
      Hugs and thanks again for bringing back fond childhood memories!
      Mariette

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    3. That's the answer Mariette - thank you

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  10. Such cheerful photos! They made me smile.

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  11. Dear Rosemary, Oh how I love these photographs. You have even included the little English daisy that I love so much.
    You might recall that I have swaths of Shasta Daisies all over my property. Well, no more. An overly zealous garden helper sprayed for dandelions and also included my daisies. I see a few missed patches, maybe enough to start all over.

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    1. Dear Gina - I really hope that you have not lost all of the Shasta Daisies, I do remember the lovely swathes you had in your garden. Fingers crossed that you can find enough to regenerate them again.

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  12. Dear Rosemary,

    Beautiful post with all the cheerful daisies, thank you for sharing this.
    Loved the poem and the sweet Daisy fairy. Reminds me when we were young we would sit down in the grass and make daisy chains to wear as necklaces.
    Happy weekend
    hugs
    Carolyn

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    1. Those childhood memories are so lovely aren't they Carolyn - summer days of long lost innocence.

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  13. Daisies are blooming here too, but not yet in gardens. The ditches and fields are full of them and there is nothing quite like a big bouquet of wild ones. This week we are seeing swathes of California poppies, Love-in-a-mist and snapdragons in the front yard.

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    1. What a lovely bouquet you paint H - all such pretty cottage garden flowers. I have lots of self seeded California poppies and love the way they arrive in so many colours from cream through to brilliant orange.

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  14. in my garden they just said good by due to high temperature ,thank you for bringing freshness to eyes and soul again ,lovely place you have here nice to meet you dear ,greetings from Asia

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    1. Thank you for visiting and for your kind comment - it is nice to meet you too

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  15. They certainly are lovely.
    Have you had 'paper daisies'?
    They are daisies, when they touch each other it sounds like paper..

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    1. No I have never heard of paper daisies, they sound fascinating.

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  16. Summer is almost there once you see the daisies and buttercups dancing in the grass - what joy!
    You have a beautiful Spring/Summer Rosemary.
    I've been brought up reading the English poets waxing lyrical about these two season.
    Wonderful photography.
    Shane

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    1. Thank you Shane - I think that it must be the contrast between our winter and then the beauty of spring/early summer that makes us almost burst with delight.

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  17. Rosemary, what beautiful daisies! I can't wait for spring to warm up and then summer!

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    1. Hope that it soon warms up for you Debra - things have improved enormously over here with some lovely skies and sunshine at last.

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  18. Hello, again. I like the daisies dancing as well as smiling.

    Yoko

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  19. Nice poem I'd not heard before. Like the tall featured daisies and also wild small ones in the lawns and meadows, Dandelions, yellow and red poppies and most flowers that are considered weeds in gardens but not in mine, although I keep them under close control.

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    1. I have lots of wild flowers in the garden, some I like some I don't. I wonder why some are more acceptable than others. The bane of our lives is Alkanet - such a pretty blue flower similar to the forget-me-not, but if it arrives in your garden it spreads like the plague and has roots that go down for ever like long thin parsnips.

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