Saturday, 4 June 2016

Early June in our Garden







Cercis siliquastrum - Judas tree
Lonicera sempervirens 











Nectaroscordum siculum subsp.bulgaricum





























Aquilegia chrysantha golden columbine




















































62 comments:

  1. I love to see your garden, Rosemary, and all is sunny and beautiful for June. Your fuchsias are spectacular, a joy to see. (Ours died over the long hot summer; it was all too much for the pretty one). My father passed away last week and I have been very preoccupied as you might imagine - however, I now begin to look forward to seeing the beauty that is an English garden in a few short months. Sissinghurst here I come :)

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    1. Dear Patricia - I am sad for you and your family that you have lost your dear father - it must have been difficult for you over the past few months but what a very long life he enjoyed. I hope past happy memories spent with him will sustain you as you come to terms with his loss.
      Sissinghurst you will love - is your visit during September?

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    2. Yes, the first half of September, Rosemary. I have been unable to work on any plans for about two months, but now will pick up the pieces and start to make some arrangements!

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  2. What a delight your garden is at this time of year with so much colour. It's lovely to see flowers in the sunshine, too - we've not had any of that in our part of the country for about a week now.

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    1. These photos were taken yesterday Wendy - the weather in our country is very fickle with such big variations and over quite small distances too.

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  3. Hello Rosemary, I am jealous your talents both for gardening and photography. A riot of color and sunshine.
    --Jim

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    1. Hello Jim - these days the garden pretty much takes care of itself apart from trimming, mowing, and general tidying up for which we do have some help. We don't tend to plant new plants anymore, but just get some new flowers for pots and hanging baskets.

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  4. Beautiful garden!! Wonderful variety of plants and the whole setting is incredible.

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    1. Thank you very much - it is looking quite pretty at the moment

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  5. Very much enjoyed viewing your garden this time of year. Love the 'structure' of it, and as you said earlier in a reply, it pretty much takes care of itself. That's where one wants to be isn't it...to get there and enjoy the results, having enjoyed the journey and then await the changes from day to day, month to month. Our Cercis Canadensis has finished blooming and now leafing out, and the garden is a riot of columbine, which I love. Your beautiful golden one with the long spurs....beautiful. (I need a new camera LOL) Love your photos.

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    1. I wonder if there is very much difference between your Cercis and ours. Mine is on it's last legs blossom wise but already in full leaf. Thank you for your kind comment.

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  6. Hello, Rosemary. I always love to see your garden. It is so beautiful in early June attire. The tree blossoms, flowers, ferns, and leaves look complementing one another. Rainy season has set in here. The floral symbols of Japanese rainy season, hydrangeas and irises, are already in bloom due to the warmer spring.

    Yoko

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    1. Hello Yoko - our hydrangeas are not in flower yet, and will not be for several weeks, but the irises around my pool are now opening more and more each day. I was sad to see May depart, but June is also a lovely month.

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  7. Good to see so much healthy box. I hope it will be spared the trouble I know you've had elsewhere in the garden. The alliums are wonderful.

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    1. I do fear for the remaining Box Jessica, but there is absolutely nothing we can do about it.

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  8. Lovely selection of flowers. Your garden is much tidier than mine. It's now a wildlife garden... which means I have to fight my way through the summer vegetation to get in it then get heckled by the local cat, sparrows, squirrels and blue tits if I sit in a chair and enjoy it, disturbing their daily feeding routine on the hanging seed balls.

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  9. Soooo beautiful, Rosemary. I love boxtrees. It's too cold here for them. Unfortunately. Happy Sunday!

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    1. I didn't realise that it was too cold in Finland to have box Satu.

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  10. Oh Rosemary, thank you for such a treat! Your garden is lovely, lovely, lovely (and I have seen a lot of gardens - once I made this interesting self-planned journey "Bed and Breakfast for garden-lovers" with my friend Anne - and stayed at a great woman who (we paid) drove us to many gardens - and her husband had a seed-"factory" and is the only man on earth I know who gave his name to a sweat pea.

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    1. My next door neighbour is a sweet pea aficionado - come the Spring and his structures go up, he then plants them and tends them like children until I must admit they look a picture. There are quite a few 'male' sweetpeas, I know that one is named after Alan Titchmarsh of TV gardening fame.

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    2. I saw Mr. Titchmarsh (from far) at the Chelsea Flower Show jubilee (I think 2013). Didn't know that they dedicated him a sweet pea.

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    3. He is a rather gorgeous shade of pale almond pink with just a hint of cream - very pretty!!!

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  11. Just beautiful Rosemary. All look really healthy and it seems your Buxus recovered.

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    1. Some of the Buxus seems to have regenerated, but the problem is still relevant, we are watching and waiting to see what transpires.

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  12. Your photos are just fantastic, Rosemary - what camera do you use? Thanks for your comments on Hastings Battleaxe - for some technical reason I can't leave a reply to them, but they are valued and appreciated.

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    1. Don't worry, I think you mentioned before that it was not possible to reply, I wonder if I could do anything from my end - I will try.
      I use a very small Sony DSC-WX350 because it goes in my pocket, and has a rechargeable longlife battery which takes roughly 470 photos and a memory card that holds 5000 photos. It also has 20 x lens which is good for distance in such a small camera.

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  13. Dear Rosemary, I have been looking forward to seeing glimpses of your always beautiful garden. And what glorious pictures these are. i see that your boxwood has recovered...I remember how worried you were when they were attacked by a disease. All looks absolutely wonderful. I must remember to introduce more perennials into my garden. It seems that I start from the beginning each Spring.

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    1. Dear Gina - some parts of the garden are free of the blight but it is still an annoying presence, if you look carefully at the photo of the sundial it can be seen on the top of the box hedging, but fresh growth is still growing around the patches so we are biding our time and keeping an eye on it.
      We no longer grow any new plants in the garden but buy a few plants such as geraniums that we add to our ornamental pots and hanging baskets.

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  14. *sigh*
    How beautiful it all is. I am still at the everything-in-pots stage as we try to get a garden going in this new-old place. The Great Dane has been working on structure and I will soon have a gate and some fencing against the deer. Your plantings are inspiring.

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    1. I think that the structure is the most important element to get correct initially, the planting can come later.

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  15. I really enjoyed the wonderful photos of your beautiful garden. Looking at your Nectaroscordum bulgaricum I remember that I miss this one in our garden. I had quite a lot of them, but changed that part of garden last year. Apparently they have disappeared, such a pity.

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    1. the Nectaroscordum siculum is a funny old plant, but I like its umbelliferous shape and off beat colours.
      I have lost so many plants over the years, but sometimes they do suddenly unexpectedly reappear again, so as it is not long since you changed the garden there is always hope.

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  16. Very beautiful plants and flowers! I love them. What a lovely garden. :)

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  17. Dearest Rosemary,
    You are lucky with your perfect climate for having such a garden.
    We for instance cannot grow any fuchsias due to the heat and the same is true for those Columbines.
    Enjoy it for the time it lasts!
    Hugs,
    Mariette

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    1. Dear Mariette - I imagine that you can grow other more exotic plants than us, ones that we have to keep inside - I suppose with our different climates it is a case of 'swings and roundabouts' or some you can and some you can't♡

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    2. Dearest Rosemary,
      It is not only the climate but also very poor soil conditions. You also have to keep in mind that Pieter and I are the VERY FIRST people living on our property. No one ever did fertilize this place. That makes a HUGE difference with the Old World where people cultivated most areas for ages.
      Hugs and happy weekend.
      Mariette

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  18. Is this your garden?
    Anyway, it's so beautiful and full of lovely flowers - and of course these photos are wonderful as usually.
    Hugs

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    1. Yes, Orvokki it is - May and June are some of my favourite months for flowers - thank you very much for your always kind comments.

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  19. Dear Rosemary,

    Your June garden is so very beautiful with all you have blooming there and thanks for showing us.
    Happy new week
    Hugs
    Carolyn

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    1. Dear Carolyn - apart from weeding, cutting the grass, hedges and filling pots and baskets etc the garden, luckily, pretty much does its own thing these days.

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  20. you created heaven around you ,your house and garden are so peaceful and relaxing it is pleasure to visit you to view and read such amazing words and sights god bless you always

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    1. Thak you for your kind comment and visit Baili

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  21. What an amazing garden you have sweet Rosemary.♥ So beautiful and I'm sure it gives you many delightful moments all year round but maybe especially this time of year when all is in bloom. Pure magic which only nature can provide. With a lot of help from keen garden owners not to forget. :)

    Take care sweet Rosemary and I hope you enjoy a lovely Monday in your beautiful garden just as much as I enjoy your beautiful pictures.♥

    Charlie
    X

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    1. Dear Charlie - I love this moment in time when everything in the garden and in nature too is so pristine, colourful and fresh - we should all make time for ourselves to enjoy.
      It is always lovely to see you here Charlie♡

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  22. I envy that garden. It is very dry and arid here in the mountains,and the deer seem to think anything you put out is for them.
    So, I just have flowers baskets to tend and enjoy...and you blog of course!

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    1. You don't really need a garden when you have such magnificent views to look at and the baskets you have bought look lovely - I feel very touched now by your kind last comment Janey.

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  23. Those are wonderful pictures of your garden. Do the allium bulbs come up each year or do you top them up? The area around your pond must be a fantastic place to relax.Sarah x

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    1. The Alliums multiply themselves so they are never topped up, each bulb seems to make at least another three or four every year.

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  24. Your garden looks amazing. Do you open to the public?

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    1. Thank you, but no we don't open it to the public.

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  25. Such a lovely garden with a lovely variety of blooms.
    Your photo's are a joy to look at

    All the best Jan

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    1. That is kind of you to say Jan - thank you

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  26. Your garden is gorgeous, Rosemary! The rock work is stunning! Blooms and blue sky made my day!

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    1. I am pleased that you enjoyed seeing the garden - the stonework was done by a very skilled Cotswold stonewaller who spent roughly a couple of years, off and on, working in the garden for us.

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  27. You have such a beautiful garden Rosemary, a paradise to enjoy, so many beautiful flowers, trees and features! When I think of my garden at the beginning of june it was more like a pond, totally flooded. Now part of the garden has turned all yellow and wilted, even the hedge is turning yellow and brown. Wait and see if it will recover.

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    1. We have very fast draining soil so it is never soggy or flooded - are you on clay?

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  28. Beautiful...what else can I say. Food for the soul as our garden is in winter dress.

    Alexa-asimplelife visiting from Sydney , Australia

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