Wednesday, 14 February 2018

Valentine's Day Greetings




The Kiss - Gustav Klimt
 Love Messenger - Marie Spartali Stillman  
This painting reveals a 'double edged sword' by showing the dependable love and beauty of the goddess Venus in the form of two symbols - a dove and a single red rose. Her love is compared to the unpredictable love of her son Cupid, whose image appears on the embroidery. Cupid holds a bow and arrow, loaded and ready to shoot, but the omens look uncertain as he is blindfolded.
The Kiss - Francesco Hayez 
The Black Brunswicker - John Everett Millais   
It is the eve of the battle at Waterloo, but the soldier's sweetheart, wearing a ball gown, restrains him and tries to push the door closed, whilst he gently but firmly pulls it open.
The Black Brunswickers were a special troop raised by Frederick William Duke of Brunswick (1771-1815) in 1809. The regiment consisted of the best German gentlemen and was known as the ‘Death or Glory’, a name derived from their distinctive death’s head hat badge and their apparent devotion to duty. The troops suffered severe losses at the battle of Quatre Bras, Waterloo in 1815.  Millais used Kate, Charles Dickens daughter, as the model.

The Garden of Love - Peter Paul Rubens 
This painting celebrates Rubens marriage to Helena Fourment, his second wife, who was sixteen years old when they married and Rubens was fiftythree. She was deemed 'the most beautiful women in Antwerp'. In the painting she is shown on the left being nudged along by a cupid.
The scene shows a group of people frolicking around in an idealised garden where cupids carry symbols of marital love including a pair of doves. The fountain
showing Venus nursing a baby and a sculpture of the three Graces all signify fertility and nuptial happiness. The peacock symbolises the goddess Juno, protector of marriage.
Love stamp (1973) designed by Robert Indiana - an American artist associated with the pop art movement
The Kiss - Edvard Munch
April Love - Arthur Hughes
A young woman looks down at fallen rose petals as her hidden suitor bends to kiss her hand. The petals symbolise the fragility of young love. 
This painting was exhibited at the Royal Academy of Arts in 1856, and following the exhibition it was bought by William Morris. He narrowly beat John Ruskin to the purchase who also desired it
paintings via wiki

37 comments:

  1. A lovely selection Rosemary. It’s good to se Edvard Munch's kiss after his very stark scream. Hope you have a lovely day. B x

    ReplyDelete
  2. Happy Valentine's Day, Rosemary. I enjoyed your Painterly Love pictures very much, some old favourites, and a few new to me. April Love is one I always enjoy, such a beautiful shade of violet, wonderfully painted.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello Patricia - yes, I can well understand why Wm. Morris and John Ruskin both desired it so much.

      Delete
  3. I love the purple in 'April Love' When was this painted?

    ReplyDelete
  4. Replies
    1. Glad that you enjoyed seeing them on this Valentine's Day.

      Delete
  5. These are beautiful, and I haven't ever seen most of them. May your day be filled with love.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Hello Rosemary, I guess that people loved the U.S. postal service more when stamps were eight cents, although probably they were complaining about the raise from six cents! Of course Munch's painting is much earlier, but it reminds me of Jan Svankmajer's animated film Dimensions of Dialog, where the two animated heads dissolve into each other, so it was possibly an influence.

    Happy Valentine's day, and Happy Chinese New Year!
    --Jim

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello Jim - I suspect that the U.S postal service has suffered a decline rather like our own postal service due to the internet and in particular people using email.
      I don't know Jan Svankmajer's animated film Dimensions of Dialog - I will take a look at Google and see if there is anything there.
      Happy Valentine's day and Chinese New Year to you too.

      Delete
    2. Just taken a look Jim - some of his heads remind me of paintings by Giuseppe Arcimboldo, the c16th Italian painter.

      Delete
    3. Glad you found it! All three sections are good, but the Arcimboldo section is my favorite. The Passionate Dialogue is slightly R-rated, but after all it is Valentine's day.

      His extreme short film, "Flora", also Arcimboldesque, at only 30 seconds packs quite an environmental-political message:
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2quzLL4XacQ

      --Jim

      Delete
  7. Dear Rosemary, What a lovely Valentine's message. Something old and something new, to me. All beautiful presentations of Love and honor.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dear Gina - glad that you enjoyed seeing the different paintings.

      Delete
  8. Happy Valentines Day Rosemary. I enjoyed seeing all the love related art work. ;-)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hope you have had a happy day Catherine - did you get ant flowers or chocolates?

      Delete
    2. Chocolates I'm afraid. ;-) Might as well just put them in my back pocket. That's where they're going anyway.

      Delete
  9. Love is definitely in the air today Rosemary. Beautiful paintings, my favorite being the romantic, gorgeous colors in Love Messenger - and of course always Klimt's KISS!

    Happy St. Valentine's Day to you and your love.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Love Messenger has so much exquisite detail in it - ♡ to you too Mary.

      Delete
  10. Love -- the favourite subject of artists everywhere! Happy Valentines Day!

    ReplyDelete
  11. A wonderful selection of paintings! I knew it was Klimt even before scrolling down.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You are right William - after my own little effort then Klimt's Kiss was the first to spring to mind.

      Delete
  12. A belated Happy Valentine's Day - I especially like April Love.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That painting is proving to be the most popular one - the colours in it are lovely

      Delete
  13. Lovely set there and a couple of my favourite paintings. I found myself wondering (after watching damselflies mating and forming a perfect heart shape some years ago- you can google the image and decide for yourself if it has any merit) if this wasn't the true inspiration for the human heart design.(and the origin of the fairy myth) The human heart looks nothing like this design and Medieval humans would know this perfectly well but they would see "damsel"-flies in the fields making this shape every Spring when everything else was bursting into life. Just a thought.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I have wondered where the heart shape originated from myself - what you suggest makes sense. I have seen the perfect heart shape formed by damsel-flies as they fly around our garden pond. One of the most memorable things that I ever witnessed was the final dance of the Mayflies which I saw as I stood on the bridge at Carrbridge one early June evening whilst looking at the old packhorse bridge crossing the river Dulnain.

      Delete
  14. Dear Rosemary, thank you for this lovely, lovely presentation ! Some paintings were new to me - all were touching. On the Millais painting I think: maybe the hand of the young soldier at the door hints at the near departure?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dear Britta - you are right, he is anxious to depart and join his regiment - it is the eve of the Battle of Waterloo.

      Delete
  15. Thank you for the varied selection of paintings to remember Valentine's Day. I love the satin dress in "The Black Brunswicker", beautifully captured in this sad but lovely painting.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The satin dress is amazing - I agree with you.

      Delete
  16. Although Valentine's Day is now past, these paintings are lovely representations of love. Klimt's Kiss has always been a favourite of mine. I hope you have had a good week.

    ReplyDelete

❖PLEASE NOTE❖ Comments made by those who hide their identity will be deleted

“You can't stay in your corner of the forest waiting for others to come to you - you have to go to them sometimes”
― A.A. Milne, Winnie-the-Pooh