Sunday, 11 March 2018

Mothering Sunday


Originally Mothering Sunday was a c16th religious event here that had nothing to do with mothers at all. The word "mothering" referred to the "mother church", which is to say the main church or cathedral of the region. It became a tradition that on the fourth Sunday of Lent people would return to their mother church for a special service. This pilgrimage was apparently known as "going a-mothering", and it became something of a holiday event. Domestic servants were traditionally given the day off work to visit their families and attend a service at their mother church. Walking home they would often pick bunches of wild flowers from the hedgerows and woods to give to their mothers and to decorate the church.
 courtesy PigeonParkPress
Ann Jarvis is recognised as the mother who inspired Mother’s Day in the United States, she was a social activist and community organiser during the Amercian Civil War era. It was her daughter, Anna, who compaigned for a Mother's Day to be held during May in memory of her mother, and it was President Wilson who formalised the date to be the second Sunday in May. 
Today is Mothering Sunday here, which also means that Easter is now only three weeks away.
  Whoever you are and wherever you are enjoy a lovely day

28 comments:

  1. Surprising, this is new to me. Actually, in our country we have Mother´s Day on the second Sunday of May, so may be we have another story, I don´t know.

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    1. That is the same date as the USA which many countries around the world have subsequently adopted too. Also, in the USA it is referred to as Mother's Day, whereas we call it Mothering Sunday.

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  2. Happy Mothering Sunday to you Rosemary. Some churches in Australia celebrate Mothering Sunday today, but it is disconnected from Mother's Day, the second Sunday of May. For many years my parents held a large outdoor picnic on Mother's Day for the extended family of their six children, their spouses and the grandchildren, and often assorted in-laws and cousins. It was such a great tradition, and I do miss it, especially as my own family is scattered around the world!

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    1. Life today is so different isn't it Patricia? We only have Mothering Sunday here and nothing in May.

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  3. That is very early, here it is in May, oh I see Janneke had the same comment :)

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    1. On the whole I think that most countries follow in the footsteps of the USA and celebrate in May.

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  4. Hello Rosemary, I had never heard of Mothering Sunday, but I like the sentiment and tradition of it, regardless of religious belief or affiliation. Like Mother's Day itself, it is a good opportunity to look back with appreciation on our parents, ancestors and heritage.
    --Jim

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    1. Hello Jim - I really like the sentiments you express here of looking back with appreciation to our parents, ancestors and heritage.

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  5. Dear Rosemary, Hope you have a very happy Mothering Day. I love the special rose design you created.

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    1. Thank you Gina and may you also have a special day together with Mr.G. The rose is, as I am sure you will recognise, courtesy of that little picmonkey.

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  6. I always learn something here. ;-) I had no knowledge of Mothering Sunday in the UK. Here in the USA, I just thought Mother's Day was another holiday created by a greeting card company.

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    1. Ann's daughter Anna Jarvis became increasingly disillusioned with the commerialisation of Mother's Day during the 1920s - I wonder what she would think about it today?

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  7. I've heard of the term before, but didn't know its origin.

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    1. I knew that here it did originally have a religious context, but only recently actually discovered to what extent.

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  8. I had a vague idea of this but thanks for reminding me.

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    1. I was curious as to why in this country we call it Mothering Sunday, and in other countries it is known as Mother's Day.

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    1. Thanks - I had a bit of fun playing around.

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  10. Interesting read Rosemary.
    Mother’s Day is in May here..

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    1. Some countries follow the same date as us - but most follow the same date as the USA.

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  11. Wonderful background - and a lovely rose, Rosemary! Here's to all the wonderful mums in the world!

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  12. Didn't even know.Interesting to learn all this.May God bless all mothers and may all children have a mother to love.

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    1. That is right Olympia, so many children are alone in the world these days separated from their mothers and families by terror and war.

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  13. A lovely gentle post Rosemary, and I love your rose picture.

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  14. I always seem to learn something here....in addition to seeing beautiful photography.

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