Tuesday, 22 October 2013

What is this plant called?

This is not one of my flower quizzes - I do not know the name of the flower below which I spotted growing wild in the pine forests of Croatia. It was not difficult to see as it grows very tall - it is sturdy and statuesque, the biggest being about 5 feet in height. The plant has a very thick strong stem at the base, rather like the stem on Brussel sprouts, which gradually tapers to the top.
We saw several of them growing under the trees, the only plant that they bore any resemblance to was the garden Delphinium.
STOP PRESS - the answer is found. Inge suggested a Campanula, and I have searched all the many varieties of which there are over 500 species. I found the answer on a website here photographed in the exact same pine forest on the Makarska Riviera, Croatia as mine. It is called a Campanula PYRAMIDALIS
On this photo it is possible to see how thick the stem is even towards the top of the plant.
At the top of the plant the stem becomes quite slender.
I have done this 'mock up' of a brussel sprout stem. Hopefully it will give some indication as to the size and robustness of the stem at its base which I neglected to photograph .

40 comments:

  1. Replies
    1. Dear Olympia - thank you very much for your suggestion. I do know that it is not Jacob's Ladder as I have that growing in my garden. It is a very big plant - I have looked in my wild flower books covering Northern Europe so it must grow within Southern Europe.

      Delete
  2. No idea Rosemary but very pretty. Hope you had a great time. Just catching up with my reading.
    Patricia x

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I wish I knew of a website where I could submit the flower to hopefully find the answer.

      Delete
  3. I think it is a Campanula...maybe it is the canterburry bluebells.
    There a many Campanula's...
    It is a beautiful flower.

    Have a nice day Rosemary,
    Greetings,
    Inge, my choice

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dear Inge - I also thought that it resembled a Campanula and have looked at the different species of which there are more than 50.
      I have been searching and searching on the internet and have just found it here if you are interested.
      http://botany.cz/cs/campanula-pyramidalis/
      You were right it is a Campanula but a PYRAMIDALIS
      On the website it says that it was photographed at the Makarska Riviera, Croatia in exactly the same pine forest as I photographed mine. What a coincidence - I am delighted to have got the answer and you helped point me in the right direction. Thank you.

      Delete
    2. I´am glad I helped you find the name off the plant.
      There are many Campanula´s..and you are right it is the PYRAMIDALES.
      Greetings..

      Inge, my choice

      Delete
    3. Thanks Inge - the detective work paid off well.

      Delete
  4. Beautiful! At first sight it made me think of Delphinium as well Rosemary but I see you found the right answer already.Beautiful flowers! So very summerlike still. Love the colour.
    Marian

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I had never come across this plant before Marian - I do like finding plants that are completely new to me. The internet is great at solving problems as we both know so well.

      Delete
    2. But the internet can set you on the wrong foot sometimes as well. Remember that plant I saw in Wales this summer.... Luckily you were there to point me into the right direction then ;) It was called something with a police helmet I think ;)
      Marian

      Delete
    3. Yes, I remember that - Himalayan Balsam, also known as policeman's helmet - a lovely plant but a scourge to get rid of.

      Delete
  5. I'm glad the mystery is solved! I love the blue flowers and I wonder (as I always do) if it's good for bees and other insects.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I am sure it is good for bees and insects as the stamens are covered in pollen - I certainly acquired a few bites on my legs that day as we wandered through the woods.

      Delete
  6. Dear Rosemary,
    there are over 470 sorts of bellflowers (campanula) - so it is not easy to detect your sort! I looked up many of them - but either the height or the shape of the flower or the coarseness of the stem wasn't right. Seems like a mixture between the very strong Campanula latifolia var. macrantha + Campanula lactiflora as 'Prichard's Variety' - or so...

    ReplyDelete
  7. Oh - as I don't read other comments before commenting my self I now see that the riddle is already solved - but in the meantime I have seen lots of interesting bellflower-pictures :-)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dear Britta - I have also had my fill of bell flowers too - we shall both be experts on the Campanula now.

      Delete
  8. It's beautiful, I'm glad you found the name!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, the mystery is solved - imagine that I found the name on the internet and showing a photo of the flower taken in the very same wood that I photographed mine in.

      Delete
  9. Happy to hear your mystery is solved Rosemary! What a pretty flower it is. I haven't come upon it in Holland.

    Thank you too for your sweet words on my blog. They helped to soothe the pain a little!

    Madelief x

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dear Madelief - it is so lovely to hear from you♥ - the plant grows wild in south east Europe in Italy and the western Balkans, but apparently it is also sold in specialised garden nurseries as an ornamental plant for the garden. The ones I saw were about 5 feet tall but apparently can grow to 8 or 9 feet.

      Delete
  10. Glad you managed to identify your pretty plant. Sarah

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Isn't the internet an amazing source of information Sarah, and to think that the photo I found was taken in the very same forest as I took mine. Thank you for your visit.

      Delete
  11. How wonderful that the puzzle is solved! I would not have been able to help you... Happy days, Rosemary! Glad you had a wonderful trip to Croatia! Christa

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Christa - this plant was so big and statuesque that I will remember it if I see it again.

      Delete
  12. Never saw this kind of Campanula, but it's a gorgeous flower !

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I was really surprised when I saw it growing in the forest and also delighted to discover something I had never seen before.

      Delete
  13. Those typical buds give the clue, don't they.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You're right Nilly the buds give it away.

      Delete
  14. 5 feet?? WOW!!! I need that plant for my blue garden. I love its lavender color. You were in Croatia, Rosemary? I hear it is beautiful and much like Italy. Look forward to catching up on your posts.....a bit hectic and busy at the moment. We're off to Maine and Sweden. Take care, Loi

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's a giant Loi - I understand that it can reach up to 9 feet with its very robust stem. Have a good trip.

      Delete
  15. Hello Rosemary

    What a spectacular sight. I would not have guessed. I had a variety of campanula in my garden one time and they were quite delicate. Isn't it wonderful to find a new plant?
    Helen xx

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dear Helen - I was very surprised when I came across it as we were walking through the forest. The last time we visited Croatia we came across a yellow orchid I had never seen before in the same wood.

      Delete
  16. It's a lovely plant, and I do like the colour.
    I could have sworn I did a comment but upon thinking that I most likely forgot to fill in the verification bit when using my iPad...I actually thought the single bloom looked like an orchid.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You are right the single bloom does rather resemble an orchid - I looked in spam but your comment was not there - sorry about that.

      Delete
  17. Dear Rosemary,
    Thanks for youre nice words on my blog.
    The wreath is make from stone oak...the leave´s are a little bit smaller than the normaly oak.

    Greetings,
    Inge, my choice

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It is very effective - reminds me a bit of a Roman laurel leaf - I am just about to post about the Romans.

      Delete
  18. Glad you found an answer to your quest ... I envy your perfect photos !

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you - I only have an ordinary Sony point and shoot camera - the secret is in cutting them down which I do on Picmonkey.

      Delete
  19. I was once tempted to try my hand at growing Campanula pyramidalis when I discovered it in the Chilterns seed catalogue, which I absolutely love as you can always find really obscure varieties within its pages.

    ReplyDelete

❖PLEASE NOTE❖ Comments made by those who hide their identity will be deleted

“You can't stay in your corner of the forest waiting for others to come to you - you have to go to them sometimes”
― A.A. Milne, Winnie-the-Pooh