Sunday, 31 January 2021

Flower Quiz

Jim from Road to Parnassus recently set a great quiz, and I was reminded that it is now a very long time since I did one of my flower or object quizzes. 

TWO PURPLE FLOWERS


I have searched for the above wildflower whenever I have been in the right location, but have only discovered it once. It can be found in various shades including white, pink, mauve and purple. 

1. What is the plants Latin name?

2. Common name?

3. What family does it belong to?

4. The region and the habitat where it grows - e.g riverside, meadow, forest etc?


The above flower is much smaller than it appears - it is roughly 4cms in diameter - look very carefully at the photo, the clue is there!
The plant above resides in our bathroom where it has been flowering continuously for the past three months. It has three very simple petals and tends to live for about three days, and then another one quickly replaces it. Its location and the way it lives is the polar opposite to the first flower.

The same questions apply again:-

1. The Latin name,

2. Common name.,

3. Family it belongs to 

4. Region where it grows and habitat.

Comments Moderation will be switched on. Only those with the correct answer will be held back until I reveal the answer in a few days time.

44 comments:

  1. Well, Rosemary, You have now got your revenge for the corn husker! I cannot identify either of these, although the top one seems familiar.
    --Jim

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    Replies
    1. Hello Jim - I would have thought that the second one might be more familiar than the first.

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  2. Ugh, I'm so bad at identifying flowers. The most I can say is that I think the first one is an aster of some description and the second one might be an orchid?

    LOL @ Parnassus (Jim) re Corn Husker Revenge!

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    1. Sorry Debra the first is not an aster of any description and the second one is not an orchid.

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  3. Dearest Rosemary,
    Giving up and also due to lack of season indication, diameter etc.
    Are they wildflowers or bulbs...?
    Hugs,
    Mariette

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    Replies
    1. Dear Mariette - they both grow in the wild - neither of them are bulbs - the last one, which I did mention, is currently flowering and has been doing so for the past three months - it still has plenty of flowers to come. The first flower is small about the size of a snowdrop, and flowers during late Spring into early summer.

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    2. Rosemary, no leaves are being shown here for the 1st mystery flower; will be hard to guess!

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    3. Two people have already guessed correctly.

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    4. I have now included a leaf for you Mariette.

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  4. Message for David - the second flower is not an orchid.

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    1. Damn! But that means I nailed the first one. Yippee!

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  5. That first flower looks so fragile and almost hand-made! What a thrill that must be to come upon something so beautiful!! My plant ID class in Illinois had nothing like either of these plants! I cannot wait to see the "big reveal"!!!


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    1. Dear Mary - you are right, I was absolutely thrilled to discover it growing in its natural, rather majestic habitat, having searched for it many times over the years.

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  6. I'll pass on that as its getting past my bedtime.

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  7. We used to have the bottom one growing in a paddock when we lived further north but I don't know its name. Don't recognise the top one.

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  8. Interesting quest - be interested in the answer to both. I expect we have them growing here.

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    1. The first one definitely would not survive in your part of the world, but it is likely that the other one does, although it is not native to Australasia.

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  9. P.S. Is there a reason why you have switched to comment moderation?

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    Replies
    1. If you read the last paragraph it tells you why.

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    2. Ah. I passed before getting to the last paragraph. I thought you may be assaulted by trolls or something.

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  10. Dear Rosemary,
    This is difficult. I know many flowers but do not recognize either one. The second flower could belong to the Iris family. What is charming is that they bloom inside, in winter, and that they both are repeat bloomers. And oh, what fabulous blues.

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    Replies
    1. Dear Gina - I agree with you it does appear to resemble an Iris. However, the photo is a bit deceptive as the flower is quite small.

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  11. This is really a hard guessing game Rosemary!
    First one perhaps an African Daisy of some kind, second one an Aconite?
    Don't think I'm correct on either - just wild guesses I'm afraid and will have to leave it up to the real plantsmen/women!!!!

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    Replies
    1. Sorry Mary the first has nothing to do with the daisy family, and the the second is not an Aconite. You are welcome to try again should you wish.

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  12. Wow difficult, the first one don't know , the second one could be an Iris siberica or some kind of Phaelenopsis .

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    1. Sorry Jane - neither of them are correct. Please look at what I said to Gina about the second one resembling an Iris.

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  13. These are hard! I can only guess the first might be an aquatic flower and the second looks iris-like, but you've already said no to that idea. No idea, in other words!

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    Replies
    1. Thanks for trying - definitely not aquatic for the first, and the second, although the flower does appear to resemble an iris, the photo is deceptive. The flower is small.

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  14. No idea. Does the first one grow only in wild, no cultivar? Each time you give a flower quiz, I’m reminded how ignorant I am of the name of the flowers.

    Yoko

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    Replies
    1. I have never ever seen the first one growing here, but apparently, according to the Royal Horticultural Society, it will grow here and in N. Europe.

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  15. Good morning dear Rosemary,
    I have no idea what flower it is.
    Have a wonderful day
    Marijke

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  16. Dear Rosemary, this is really a heavy one! As always I do not look at your answers to the followers - and I do not think that any of my guesses is right - but I try:
    maybe the first flower is
    - Hepatica nobilis, synonyms Anemone hepatica or Hepatica triloba)
    -We call it Leberblümchen - the English name might be liverwort or liver leaf?
    - It belongs to the family of Ranunculaceae
    - flowering in early spring before the new leaves are properly formed. Shade, humus rich soil, I found it sometimes under beech - but with rounder petals.
    So - I am not very convinced that I might be right.

    The second flower:
    has the blue of a tradescantia - but I think it might be an orchid.
    I am really interested what your flowers are! Britta

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  17. My first guess must be wrong - a bit different leaves, I see now.

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    1. Dear Britta - these flowers appear to be proving much harder than I had anticipated to guess. At first I thought that they were far too easy because the first answer that arrived got 10/10 to every question that I asked. However, since then only one other person has named one more flower correctly.
      I will not leave you in suspense for too much longer.

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“You can't stay in your corner of the forest waiting for others to come to you - you have to go to them sometimes”
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