Friday, 22 February 2013

Architectural Quiz

These little buildings are familiar up and down Britain and come in many styles. They always have a solid roof. Often they have a fancy finial on the top or a weathervane as can be seen in these images.
If you are in the UK you will know what they are, but fellow bloggers overseas may not be familiar with them.

They are not pixie, fairy or gnome houses!!!
Answer on Sunday morning GMT. If you get it correct your comment will be shown then.
all images courtesy wikipedia

47 comments:

  1. Hello Rosemary, I'm pretty sure these are local hoosegows.

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  2. Are they for defense purposes? Maybe to keep an eye on enemy manouvres from the inside?

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  3. I love this game! I am thinking they are hop houses, although the one on the bridge has me a little confused...

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  4. Aren't these lock-ups, small village prisons that were used until the 19th century? They come in all shapes and are entirely from brick. That brick roof was important so wrongdoers wouldn't be able to escape.
    Love your quizes Rosemary! But you probably already knew that ;-)
    Bye,
    Marian

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  5. Some kind of guardian shelters? Have a great weekend, Rosemary!

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  6. Lovely photos Rosemary. I've always known these little buildings as Follies and as you say often found in the grounds of large country houses but of course there could be another name for them? Have a great weekend.
    Patricia x

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  7. I am not sure about the era they were built in.!
    I am going to give two guesses, that they were -resting places for the monk's traveling ..from village to village. A place , where food would be left for them also.
    Thy might be for little guard houses for overnight ..
    very interesting.
    Here we have old white ones on some of the outlying hills around the country.. they are called ermitas..
    Dying to know the answer.
    Nice to be back..
    x

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  8. Possibly a water tower or water regulator or measuring water flow? Happy Friday to you. ox, Gina

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  9. Hello, rosemary! I guess it is a small roadside church. It would be equivalent to our stone Jizo Bodhisattva statue standing at the crossroads or a roadside altar which enshrines Jizo Bodhisattva, who is believed to protect mainly children and travellers.

    Yoko

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  10. Were they toll houses?

    Darien Reece
    darienkerr@gmail.com

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  11. Hi Rosemary, no clue what the purpose of these buildings is and no time to research it, but one thing is for sure they are pretty and fit so well into the surrounding landscape. Looking forward when you are publishing the solution for your quiz.
    Christina

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  12. It's probably wrong, but... is it a folly?

    Rosemary...there might well be pixies or little "Borrowers" living in there, you know?

    CIAO!

    ANNA
    xx

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  13. Hello dear friends - I like your answers, some very imaginative - follies, toll houses, shrines, water regulators, resting places for monks, hop houses, defence for keeping an eye on the enemy - what a great selection of ideas. Several people mentioned guard houses, or guardian shelters, I am not sure what you mean by that, perhaps one of you would like to clarify that a bit more?

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  14. Whatever they are, they are certainly charming - in a rugged fairy tale kind of way. But then I always feel that way about a lot of things I saw in Britain when I was there many years ago. Such a gorgeous country...I always thought I'd return but I never got the chance. Still, I'm fortunate to have been there at least once.

    I'm curious as to what the answer will be, Rosemary. They look like gnome castles to me. :)

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    1. Watch out for the answer on Sunday Yvette.

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  15. Are they the naughty rooms where one is sent to after misbehaving at the dinner table?!

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    1. Good question Paul - I suppose that it depends on how naughty!!!

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  16. Dear Rosemary,

    After much research and consultation, I have it on good word that 17th century English tax collectors would accept bundled shortbread in lieu of taxes. They'd store the goodies in these little warehouses, which is where they'd also have lunch. Eventually the practice was outlawed because the tax collectors focused on the shortbread to the exclusion of the taxes. Even back then there were pesky whistleblowers in government!

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    1. Dear Mark - very plausible, but to my knowledge definitely untrue in England. However, it may be true of Scotland where shortbread is their national delicacy.

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  17. I have really no idea. I will read it on sunday.
    Have a wonderful weekend Rosemary

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  18. Hello Rosemary!
    Could they be police men's shelters? Most intriguing!
    Best regards,
    Erika

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    1. Not policemen's shelters, but a good try Erika.

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  19. Hello Rosemary

    It is called a "Leave me Alone House"

    Helenxx

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    1. Hello Helen - I just love your answer.

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  20. I'm enjoying your quizzes!! So fun! I look forward to finding out the answer!

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    1. Once you know what they are you can watch out for them.

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  21. Just had an idea! Could it be a tollhouse?

    CIAO!

    ANNA

    xxx

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  22. People must have been a lot shorter in the past.

    Greetings,
    Filip

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    1. I think you are right they were definitely not so tall in the 18th and 19th centuries.

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  23. R has suggested that these buildings were old village prisons.

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  24. how beautiful+different, thats for showing them to us:-) happy weekend from very cold+windy tulipland!

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    1. Good weekend to you too Jana in tulipland.

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  25. I love these little houses!! I don't know, I'm not sure what they are, but I imagine maybe for travling knights??? Maybe that is way too silly… But they are darling to look at!!!

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    1. Good attempt Marica - correct answer tomorrow.

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  26. I have no idea but i can imagine that is a little space for the people to protect from bad weather ,snow or rain ?? I shall wait for the answer !!!
    Have a nice Sunday !
    Olympia

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    1. Dear Olympia - they are well built and would keep the weather out, but that is not their purpose.

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  27. Hello Rosemary,
    really seem to house elves, an enchanted world!
    Beautiful pictures, as always.
    a hug

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    1. Hello Antonio - not even elves alas - thanks for trying.

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  28. Dear Rosemary,i can't guess about those little buildings!I'll wait tomorrow for the answer!Have a lovely weekend!
    Dimi..

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    1. Dear Dimi - tomorrow all will be revealed.

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  29. I have seen photos of these buildings and some with a tap on the outside, so therefore something to do with water, but I don't know what they are called..that is my guess :)

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    1. There are little buildings, much smaller, but which share a similarity to these. Some were built over well heads or springs and are called drinking fountains - good thoughts.

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  30. Hmmmm...... Still guessing and wondering--tomorrow's reveal should be very interesting, and enlightening both.

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“You can't stay in your corner of the forest waiting for others to come to you - you have to go to them too.”
― A.A. Milne, Winnie-the-Pooh