Wednesday, 7 October 2015

Garden Journey continues........

The climb up from the Chinese garden in Biddulph leads to a representation of a ruined medieval building

into a Victorian oddity known as a Stumpery 
As the name implies a Stumpery is literally made from tree stumps. The pieces are arranged artistically and plants, typically ferns, mosses and lichens are encouraged to grow around or on the wood. Stumperies were a popular feature in C19th gardens, and may have been the result of the Romantic Movement which emphasised the beauty of nature but most likely they were the consequence of a growing interest in ferns
At the end of the Stumpery there are two choices - go through the archway and under the Watch Tower which leads back down into the lower garden or climb up through the Stumpery to a higher level in the garden 
The outlook from the  Watch Tower gives an interesting view along the 'Dahlia Walk'


At this higher level Bateman built his 'Egyptian Garden' complete with topiary pyramid clipped from Yew
The corridor running beneath the pyramid has two exits - this one leading to the Arboretum and Pinetum
the other exit is from this so called 'Cheshire Cottage' which eventually leads back down to the lower garden
The original Grange that Bateman bought in 1840 was burnt down in 1896 but by that time he had moved away to live in London
There is much more to see in this garden than I have shown - a Cherry Orchard, a Wellingtonia Avenue, Bowling Green, Rose, Verbena and Araucaria Parterres along with the Pinetum and Arboretum
Biddulph is a garden that provides all year round interest,
but now like departing swallows we too are travelling South for a few days
Linocut by youngest son, one of his greetings cards published by Green Pebble 

40 comments:

  1. Thank you for the further photos, Rosemary. Now I really am DETERMINED to see Biddulph Grange! it looks as if it is worth a substantial detour.

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    1. Dear Jenny - if you are in the Derbyshire Peak District then it is just over the border into Staffordshire, alternatively it is not too far off the M6 should you be travelling north or south at sometime in the future.

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  2. There is a lot to explore in the garden, it looks so well maintained.

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    1. The whole garden is kept in perfect order

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  3. Amazing topiary. I'm glad it's not me who has to clip it all. Such formality in the dahlia walk, was he a collector I wonder.

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    1. Bateman was a plant collector and an avid orchid grower and expert - not sure about the dahlias but I suspect he was a collector or why would he have created such a splendid Dahlia Walk?

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  4. Biddulph continues to fascinate me, Rosemary. The stumpery is indeed an oddity, but an endearing one at that. I can see how well it would work for ferns and might be tempted to try to make one - except that it would be an excellent haven for snakes! The Dahlia Walk is very grand and beautiful, and the topiary pyramid so clever. The swallow linocut is so sweet - your son has a great talent, and you must be very proud of him.

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    1. Dear Patricia - Prince Charles has a rather grand stumpery at Highgrove which he created about 20 years ago. I can well imagine that a stumpery in Australia would be an attraction to snakes.

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  5. I have so enjoyed reading your blog this early morning with my coffee.....and I have learned a new word to use. Stumpery.
    Enjoy your getaway and don't forget your camera......Janey

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    1. I think that a Stumpery is very much a British thing, but I have seen them on the Continent too. Most likely the idea was copied originally from here.

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  6. Magnificent garden...something different around eac corner.
    Enjoy your break a way...

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    1. Thanks Margaret - keeping my fingers crossed for descent weather - the Indian Summer has broken and we have been having rain.

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  7. What wonderful gardens - so many interesting features. It is somewhere I would love to visit. Great photos!

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    1. I would image that your son would love it there - the garden is great for children who like to explore.

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  8. What a spectacular garden! I've never even heard of a stumpery before. Love your son's linocut!

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    1. Thanks Debra - it is a fun garden to visit.

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  9. Hello Rosemary, I love the contrasts between wild and formal areas in this garden, and also the preponderance of greenery. On the card, your son has achieved great variety of personality among the birds with just a few colors and lines--a quality often found in Chinese art.

    Enjoy your trip, Jim

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    1. Hello Jim - we are hoping that the weather will be good, however, our Indian Summer has now broken. The garden is certainly green and very lush, but nothing is overgrown or out of place.
      That is an interesting fact about the linocut, I have relooked at it with fresh eyes.

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  10. What an interesting garden. I've never seen a stumpery before, it's beautiful and not a little bit creepy. I love the different statues and the archway, it really looks like a fairy tale garden to me.

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    1. I can imagine that the stumpery would look great if it was decorated for Halloween with pumpkins and lights. I am sure it is a garden that your children would love to visit.

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  11. The stumpery really is amazing isn't it, as you know it was pouring with rain when we visited and the stumpery looked amazing as all the moss was so glossy and drippy, just how you would want a stumpery to look really! Great to see more of your "in the dry" pictures! xx

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  12. There is a lot to admire at Biddulph Grange, I include it in one of my slide show presentations. It is difficult to choose between the Dahlia Walk and the Chinese Garden, which I think just edges it for me. The difference in the pictures from before the NT restored it and now is amazing.

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    1. The whole garden is immaculate - I did go many, many years ago, but can now only remember the Chinese garden as I had never seen anything quite like it before.

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  13. It's so interesting visiting these gardens with you. I never thought I lacked imagination but the people who thought up all these towers, walkways, viewpoints, etc clearly have much more of that elixir of life than I'll ever have!

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    1. Bateman inherited a lot of money Rosemary - he had a great vision but people will move mountains for you when you can pay them.

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  14. Definitely a garden worth a looong visit. I never heard of Stumpery's , but what a great idea if arranged 'artistically' like here !

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  15. Fantastic topiary/hedge cutting. I really don't like stumperys, always give me the creeps!

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  16. After such a great large and very diverse, and well-tended garden has not walking around, so thank you for a wonderful experience. * Thank you very much for your good wishes for his son and greet.

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  17. What a perfect garden, love the Egyptian influence.

    Greetings,
    Filip

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  18. This is a verry beautiful garden...
    Nice hedge's.

    Greetings,
    Inge, my choice

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  19. There are many choices which way to take and various different elements in this garden. I’m tempted to walk through the curving path (the 11th image), excited with the mystery of where to reach. Stumperies are first to me. Their enchanting look makes me imagine gnomes would be hidden inside. Have a nice weekend, Rosemary.

    Yoko

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  20. Dear Rosemary, I am in awe of these hedges and the topiary! This garden must employ an army of workers; there seems to be no blade out of place! Like commentor Stardust above, stumperies are new to me.

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  21. I love to walk with you in these lovely,, beautiful and wonderful gardens. Thanks to take me with.

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  22. Hello Dear Rosemary,
    I am working towards doing a few blogs here and there..I have missed a lot. However, its always so wonderful to see your posts.
    I have really, never seen a garden so well laid out. You have written about many, but this is so wonderful.
    Lots of Egyptian architecture.
    Thousands, must be spent on these gardens each year.
    Most enjoyable..
    best wishes..
    Happy week
    Val xx

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  23. What a stunning garden that is. Now added to my lengthening list of places to visit (when we are living back in England again). I couldn't help wondering how many gardeners they employed though!

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  24. There is so much to see in this fantastic garden, something different around every corner. Hope you find so decent weather as you head south! Sarah x

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  25. A very interesting garden I must say...
    Love,
    Titti

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  26. What a fabulous garden. I had never heard of it. Now hope to go one day.

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