Wednesday, 29 March 2017

Anglesey Abbey


Our flights via Stansted to Cyprus offered up an opportunity to visit Anglesey Abbey near Cambridge on our return
The medieval priory was not yet open for the season, however, it was the spring gardens we were drawn to see
The abbey was remodelled into a 20th century home by Lord Fairhaven, son of a wealthy American oil family, he bought it unseen at an auction when he was 30 years old. He then spent much of his time and fortune creating the perfect place in which to entertain, collect fine antiques and follow country pursuits.  

It is over 20 years ago that we first saw the drifts of newly planted dogwood shrubs, birch and willow trees, and we were keen to see just how they had developed. Grown for their colourful barks, sculptural forms and shapes, together with interesting underplanting, they looked glorious in the spring sunshine

Pretty tassels on the Acer negundo  
Fritillaria raddeana






































Anemone blanda together with Scilla siberica














Rubus thibetanus 'silver fern'
































Himalyan Silver Birch




































Sadly, all too soon it became necessary for us to abandon visiting the more formal part of the garden




Prunus serrula - Tibetan Cherry Tree
having been up since 3.00am to catch our plane back home we were tired,
and still had the drive home ahead of us
















34 comments:

  1. Hello Rosemary, You are remarkable in your stamina. After an exhausting trip, we would never make an extra stop, even for a place as enchanting as Anglesey Abbey. What a beautiful garden, even in its winter/early spring guise! I am especially pleased with Rubus thibetanus--does it have berries, and what are they like? The black raspberry has a similar bloom on the canes, but not with such a white effect.
    --Jim

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    1. Hello Jim - I think that we are both suffering for it now - it is taking a long time for us to shake off our tiredness which we need to do quickly as visitors are coming to stay!!!
      The Rubus thibetanus does have berries - dark purpley red, and curiously it takes on the white stem bloom only during the winter months - it is also known as ghost bramble.

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  2. Wonderful photos of the garden, amazing you know all the names of the plants.

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    1. Glad that you enjoyed seeing them

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  3. Agree with Parnassus, you have amazing stamina to visit a garden after an international trip. It was certainly worth a visit, and I loved the early Spring fields of daffodils, and the sculptural forms of willow and birch. The Tibetan Cherry tree is new to me, very striking and unusual. Thank you for sharing it all with us.

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    1. Dear Patricia - I think we were perhaps rather crazy as it is taking a long time for us to recover from this trip, but I think age also if a factor too. The bronze glow on the bark of the Tibetan Cherry tree was stunning.

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  4. Oh, I love that grove of silver birch! Such beautiful trees.

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    1. I can imagine that the grove of silver birch trees must looking lovely in the snow.

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  5. I do so admire your knowledge of gardening. Memorizing all the names of so many plants and trees. This garden is beautiful even in early spring. The textures and colors of the trees bark are beautiful.
    You always make my curious and I have to go find out more. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anglesey_Abbey
    :-)

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    1. I am pleased that you found it was interesting enough to want to find out more - it is a lovely place.

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  6. Such a beautiful garden, love the silver birches.

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    1. The bark colours all looked lovely in the sunshine.

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  7. Gorgeous plants and trees, do like the daffodils.

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  8. Looks a lovely place to visit.

    Thank you. Love love, Andrew. Bye.

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    1. Glad that you enjoyed seeing it Andrew

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  9. It's a place that is high on my list to visit if we are ever over that side of the country. I love those silver birches. And the rubus. Ghostly!

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    1. Yes travelling west to east is not easy for us - it really requires an overnight stay to do it justice.

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  10. What a gorgeous garden, love all the silver birches , the red Cornus Alba ( I think ) and all the blue Anemone, just wonderful !

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    1. There is a lovely use of bark colours in that section of the garden something that is worth emulating.

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  11. Lovely, lovely early spring at the garden of the Anglesey Abbey. I was drawn to the beauty of the barks, especially the color of Tibetan Cherry Tree. Before I read the name of the tree, I could identify it as a cherry tree for the horizontal lines on the bark.

    Yoko

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    1. Well done Yoko - you know your cherry trees and soon yours will be in blossom

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  12. One word! Beautiful...
    Love from Titti

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  13. Beautiful spring is the abbey gardens. Wonderful flowers, and white bark trees impressed me. Regards.

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    1. The trees were stunning - I loved them

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  14. Love every picture...what a lovely place!
    Have a great saturday,
    Titti

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  15. I have never seen a Tibetian Cherry tree.....and those trees with the I white trunks remind me of the Colorado Aspen. You take such lovely pictures....I hope you two caught up on your rest! janey

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    1. We are finally feeling more normal Janey - thank you - good job I have visitors arriving this week for a few days.

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  16. Lovely photos. And I love the trees, all of them. I miss spring (here is raining) when I look at your photos.

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    1. Spring is just around the corner for you Orvokki

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