Sunday, 6 January 2019

I wonder

if the sap is stirring yet, 

If wintry birds are dreaming of a mate, 
If frozen snowdrops feel as yet the sun
And crocus fires are kindling one by one:


Sing, Robin, sing;
I still am sore in doubt concerning Spring. 
I wonder if the springtide of this year 
Will bring another Spring both lost and dear; 

If heart and spirit will find out their Spring, 

Or if the world alone will bud and sing: 
Sing, hope, to me; 
Sweet notes, my hope, soft notes for memory. 
The sap will surely quicken soon or late, 
The tardiest bird will twitter to a mate; 
So Spring must dawn again with warmth and bloom, 
Or in this world, or in the world to come: 
Sing, voice of Spring, 
Till I too blossom and rejoice and sing. 
Christina Rossetti
Found in the garden today.

53 comments:

  1. The situation is clear in Canada. NOTHING is stirring yet.

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    1. I know that your winter is far longer than ours Debra.

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  2. Replies
    1. The Robin is probably Britain's most favourite garden bird.

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  3. Replies
    1. They are very friendly little birds, and that is why you can get close to them.

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  4. Hello Rosemary, Spring on January 7 ? Either you people in England are spoiled with brief winters, or you are doing some early anticipating!
    --Jim

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    1. Hello Jim - it is definitely not Spring, but the Snowdrops in the garden are small harbingers of Spring together with other little signs that can be seen.

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    2. In Ohio January and February are solid winter. March is the pivotal month--it might be part of winter, or it might hold a few signs of spring, which in some years can wait until April. --Jim

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    3. Winter is so mercurial and unpredictable.

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  5. WOW! You have spring! We have 50 centimeters snow...

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    1. No it is not Spring Satu, it is still very chilly, but at least we have no snow, and, for me, long may that continue.

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  6. Thank you for sharing YOUR sap with us all!

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    1. Thank you for visiting Cloudia and also for your comment.

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  7. Today feels like spring here. It is 63 Degrees and the sky blue and the sun is out. I am not fooled... Winter hasn't really got going yet. Today is just a little gift.

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    1. I love a winters day like you describe Catherine, it really lifts the spirits, but Winter still has a long way to go.

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  8. Beautiful snowdrops and poem to go with it. Still steely grey and dour over here. Bring on the sunshine! B x

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    1. Yes please, do bring on the sunshine Barbara, it makes the whole world so much more appealing and acceptable.

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  9. Ah, Rosemary, you give us hope and a taste of things to come. What a wonderful sight are those sweet snowdrops and so beautifully photographed.

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    1. You are right Betty - the first Snowdrops are messengers of hope.

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  10. Thank you for a beautiful poem and post. Christina Rossetti is always so appealing. I have never seen a snowdrop - they look exquisite. I always imagined they would bloom in the snow, but it seems they are a predictor of Spring. The robin is so sweet and serene, and I would love a walk in your garden!

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    1. Should it snow Patricia, which I am hoping it wont, they will continue to flower as they can withstand anything the winter weather cares to throw at them.

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  11. Lovely poem and great, nostalgic photos of the wonderful robin and snowdrop. Perfect weather here - sunny and 26 0 27 degrees C. the only downside is having to water the garden daily - vegies in the morning and flower beds at night.

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    1. A British garden would not be the same without its resident Robin or clumps of snowdrops. Lucky you with that weather.

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  12. Photo of the Robin is beautiful.
    Poem is lovely.

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    1. The Robin is looking rather well fed but he has puffed his feathers out to keep himself warm.

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  13. Replies
    1. I think that our European Robin is such a lovely little bird.

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  14. What a lovely poem. We've also got snowdrops at the bottom of the garden; I must get a photo of them. I do hope spring will be here soon, I'm feeling down with all the grey sky and dull days. Your beautiful robin certainly brightens a dull day. We have quite a few visit our feeder, but they seem to grab a mouthful and fly off, they don't hang around. Best, Jane x

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    1. That is a shame that your Robin grabs his food and goes, ours tend to hang around the garden. We have two or three that seem to live with us but they are very territorial about their particular area of the garden.

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  15. So beautiful - the poem as well as the photos - you always bring a smile to my lips, Rosemary - thank you! And snowdrops in the garden make me miss mine in Hildesheim, there were heaps of them - here I have to wait to find some to buy for the balcony. But your post brings hope!

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    1. Thanks for your lovely comment Britta - hope you can find some for your balcony as they really lift the January spirits.

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  16. A beautiful winter post Rosemary, with the pretty red breasted Robin and a vase of your first Snowdrops from the garden!
    I would love to spend more time in England in Autumn and Winter!
    One of my favourite magazines is “Country Life”, I always bring a couple home from the library and read them from cover to cover!
    Shane xxx

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    1. Don't come in winter Shane, I think that you would find it far too chilly as you are used to a warmer climate.
      I like Country Life too, and always browse through it when visiting my DiL.

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  17. Oh how lovely, I really like snow drops , I had the garden filled with them in my danish cottage ( that I sold) , and they always make me nostalgic. Beautiful poem too.

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    1. I can well imagine how delightful a cottage garden in Denmark would look filled with snowdrops - sounds really delightful.

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  18. Nice poem. It's been really mild so far so we have not had a proper winter yet as frost and snow does help to keep the non native bugs in check, like scorpions and spiders. Always an up side to everything.

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    1. I thought that you were having me on Bob! But now, having looked on Google, I see that there is one species of scorpion living here - fortunately just a few, but I had no idea about them.

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  19. On my walk this afternoon, in our corner of Canada I saw a robin (American), a few first snowdrops, some pink blossoms, and my hydrangea bushes are beginning to swell. Such lovely sights, as are your glimpses which show that spring is closer for you than for me.




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    1. I have seen your Robin when I was staying with my brother in Toronto, and although it has a similar coloured breast, if I remember rightly it is a much larger bird. Spring still has a very long road to follow, but these little glimpses are uplifting.

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  20. Dearest Rosemary,
    Well, something must be stirring here as today I got dressed too warmly... Driving the good 2.5 hours north to Atlanta and thinking of getting into cooler weather there. Sunny day and quite warm in the car in my woolen sweater and also at the stores... walking of course makes one warm.
    Nature is still looking dormant but soon the red leaves from the Swamp Maple will unfold and add to the color palette once more.
    Looking forward to it. Our Galanthus have disappeared. Planted in sight for us from the kitchen bay window where we enjoy breakfast in the sun, provided the weather is such. We only enjoyed them a few years... nothing comes up.
    Enjoy the beauty in your garden, every week something new to discover.
    Hugs,
    Mariette

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    1. Dear Mariette - it is a shame that you lost your Galanthus - here they seem to thrive easily and are everywhere at this time of year - in the woods, churchyards, parks, and most people have drifts of them growing in their gardens. I am sure that you are now eagerly awaiting the first signs of your Swamp Maple unfolding its red leaves again.

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  21. Dear Rosemary,
    We are still under a foot of snow. Not complaining because we need the water for this coming growing season. We had a terrible drought this past year.
    I must admit, when I read your post, that I was envious of your beautiful flowers and mild climate. Thank you for sharing.

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    1. It may look mild Gina but it is decidedly chilly. We haven't had any snow, but that prospect cannot be ruled out until we are well into March. It would be most unusual to have snow here in April though.

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  22. Pretty post and wishful thinking. I read somewhere that Spring in Britain travels at 2mph. Can’t remember where from, maybe the equator? If so it seems to me it is traveling mighty slow! I do know that it is always a welcome sight! We are having a mild winter here and I enjoyed a walk yesterday with just a light windbreaker. Although I know that we will have occasional cold fronts at least through March.

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    1. Winter certainly seems to move at a snails pace where as summer appears to rush by in the blink of an eye.

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  23. Splendid snowdrop photos! Some have more green in them than you expect. Happy new year to you Rosemary!

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    1. Happy new year to you too Jenny & hopefully the successful completion of your book.

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  24. Your beautiful photos put a smile on my face, particularly the sweet little rotund Robin :-)

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    1. I think that we in this country all love our Robins.

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