Friday, 28 February 2020

Thought for the Day

Is life today making us all a bit neurotic?  Daily we are bombarded by unsettling news from all four corners of the globe. 
Yesterday we personally received the following information in an email, even though to date there have been just 16 cases of the coronavirus in this country, all of which have been as a result of travelling overseas.
I do realise that the idea behind this campaign is to make us all more aware of how to protect ourselves, and by doing so hopefully slow down the progression of the virus. However, all of this bombardment does makes you feel vulnerable and tends to give you feelings of a siege mentality developing. Should we all dash out and stock up on food, medicines, and toiletries etc? I personally haven't succumbed, and possibly by the time I even get round to thinking about it, all of the shop shelves will have been totally cleared of all the essentials anyway!!!
******
On a different note, yesterday we awoke to a brief scattering of snow, the first fall of the winter, and hopefully with luck it will be the last. However, within less than two hours all signs of it had completely vanished and then happily the sun came out for the rest of the day.
There were some lovely deep purple miniature irises in that front pot, but the deer have been browsing in the garden again and eaten every single flower! Fortunately the daffodils, heathers, hellebores and snowdrops do not appear to be to their taste.

54 comments:

  1. Hello Rosemary, The problem with coronavirus is not the number of cases, but the fact that it is a new and potential deadly disease, and could spread in an unknown manner, especially when there is no standard cure or treatment for it. Throughout history there have certainly been many epidemics that have killed large portions of the population, yet in their early stages they were minor causes of death, much less than from, say, flu, war, auto accidents, etc., which, however terrible they are, are at least known quantities. The same idea is that we worry less about thousands of deaths from a natural disaster, as compared to one hundred from a terrorist action in England or America, because the terrorist act may indicate an unstable society and might be the harbinger of many such acts to come.
    --Jim

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    1. Hello - I think that probably stress was less decades ago mainly because people were kept in the dark about exactly what was going on. Soldiers innocently went off to war in WW1 thinking that they were off to save King and Country without any real knowledge of just what was expected of them and what they were about to face. The families that remained at home also had no idea at all what their menfolk were enduring.

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  2. I had a text message from my doctors surgery. It said, if you feel unwell with a sore throat and cough, don't come to the surgery. Stay at home.

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    1. I suppose in reality that is probably a good idea. It is a way of keeping others who have to visit the surgery safe too.

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  3. A shame about the iris's, hopefully next year will be safe for them.
    A dusting of snow, your first one, gosh be a bit of a shock seeing as you are not too far from spring.
    The virus - we must be told about it but not to the panic stage it is at the moment from what I hear on the news.

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    1. The life for my irises is probably not secure as I expect that they will remember them again next year.

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  4. We are making preparations for the Corona virus. I have strong memories of SARS and of how poorly equipped many people were to deal with it. We always have a reasonable degree of supplies on hand knowing that snowstorms can confine us indoors for a couple of days. We intend to increase our stocks a little, starting this morning with a visit to the store armed with a list! Of course, we need to make sure we have a couple of extra bottles of wine on hand!

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    1. I suppose that must be a limit as to just how far you can plan ahead - are we talking about weeks or months? this we just don't know.

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    2. Our goal is to be good for two weeks. By the end of that time we might be eating a few odd combinations, but we won't starve!

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  5. The airline and travel businesses are going to take a beating over this. Maybe the summer Olympics too.

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    1. Apparently quite a few business are doing well here. A company making masks are doing a roaring trade as is another company that makes surgical protection cages which are normally supplied by China!!!

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  6. Like David, we have the wine, also the cheese. . . . . . and now I've become pretty adept at the bread baking, we're all set, haha! Joking aside though it is quite frightening and I'm satisfied to stay close to home - no overseas travel for a while. Many are hoping it will be like regular 'flu and just disappear once the cold weather ends. That said, as it seems to be worse in already hot climes I have my doubts the air temperature has much to do with it.

    Stay safe dears - enjoy that beautiful garden. Sorry about the munching deer, I know the iris must have been pretty. The pink flowering plant is delightful, what is that please?


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    1. If the worse came to the worse I could survive on good old porridge. After all the highlanders lived off it for most of their life centuries ago. You can dress it up with some honey etc or even make it savoury with a sprinkle of parmesan and dressed with some herbs.
      The pink flowers are heather along with a clump of white ones just slightly out of the photo. I have lots of clumps of them all around the garden in various shades of pink and white through to purple and at this time of year they are a joy.

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  7. Gorgeous garden photos Rosemary! ;-) I am not even slightly worried about this virus. I am worried about all the hysteria it is causing. People do recover from it. COVID-19 has a 2% death rate. Sars had a 10% and Mers had a 30%.

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    1. I know they say that older people are those at risk, but they don't actually stipulate what kind of older people. Do they mean fragile ones, those that have smoked or those that have underlying health issues or maybe asthma - who knows? Personally there are too many other things going on in this world that are a very big worry and more so than this virus.

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    2. At any given time, 20 million people are going to have the flu. Many weak people will die of it, just like they do every year. No one has died of CIVID-19 in the US to date. If you are going to travel, just don't eat the bat soup.

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    3. One British chap died today, he was on that ship marooned just off Japan and was then admitted to the local hospital. I will certainly bear in mind that 🦇bat soup🦇definitely off the menu!!!

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  8. Dearest Rosemary,
    Yes, the media certainly has created a hysteria over the coronavirus! Listen to this expert: https://youtu.be/PWY0oZV51VY
    Love your heathers in the bottom photo! Let's focus on the spring and enjoy the little miracles.
    Hugs,
    Mariette

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    1. Dear Mariette - I watched the video and the expert talks a lot of common sense. Yes, of course you are right we should focus on the spring and happier moments too.

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  9. Dear Rosemary,
    Watching the news this morning a doctor being interviewed suggested that only those who are infected with the Coronavirus wear masks. Would they not become outcasts?
    I always enjoy seeing glimpses of your garden.

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    1. Hello Gina, Here in Taiwan there is a rule that all people must wear masks in certain areas, and many people wear them everywhere--the idea is more to prevent breathing in the virus. When many people wear them they do not look strange, although they are uncomfortable.
      --Jim
      p.s. I too love Rosemary's garden!

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    2. Dear Gina - I think that if anyone has the virus then the most important rule that they should follow is not to go out but to isolate themselves until they are over it and no longer infectious.
      Thank you Gina and Jim - I am both flattered and happy that you both enjoy seeing the garden even at this bleakest time of the year.

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  10. Each time we have one of these pandemics the reaction seems to get even more extreme. They seem to forget how many people get ordinary flu and die every year. As for supermarket shelves, there is definitely panic buying here in Jersey. But then it doesn’t take much and the storms keep coming. Hey hoy. Have a good weekend. B x

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    1. I suppose because Jersey is such a small island and subject to a lot produce being brought over from the mainland, people are maybe panicking.

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  11. I remarked to my brother last week that people would probably avoid drinking Corona beer - I though I was joking but apparently it's happening! The world has gone mad.

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    1. That is so funny - some people are unbelievably naive.

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    1. I don't think you should either William and thanks.

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  13. A note from the CDC today said that so far 29 million people have had influenza this year, and 16,000 have died. But there's no panic about that! I'm finding the panic a wee bit over the top. Certainly, we must take precautions, but good hygiene is important all the time. We could survive quite well for several weeks on the produce in the freezer and the baking supplies on hand.

    Too bad about the irises. Deer are insatiable, it seems. I love that big round boxwood in the pot!

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    1. At this moment in time I think that is the sensible approach Lorrie and the right way to currently treat this virus.

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  14. I have already stocked up with lemsip, tins of soup, and masks just in case but I do not take it too seriously, I'm just prepared if it does occur and they are all things I'll use anyway- for winter colds- for food. £20 total cost. Two year expiry date. I feel sorry for children growing up today as they are bombarded via smart phones and TV with a daily diet of woe and gloom about the planet when they should be leading a happy, carefree daily life. No wonder mental health issues are increasing. Also, on another topic, I am concerned about the long term physiological implications of the BBC's diversity propaganda where every advert and TV programme you watch features a lesbian or homosexual couple, preferably mixed race, to tick all the diversity boxes- leading to confusion/ heartbreak/ mental problems in later life. From my own experience, (Glam rock influences at an early age in the 1970s), gender preference can be somewhat fluid in teenage years and open to influence/ experimentation/ natural teenage curiosity without constant daily propaganda from television adding any additional influence. Many people are susceptible to messaging which explains how adverts and beg-verts work, why Hitler, Trump and Boris got in, and why reality TV is popular world wide. Luckily, as an adult, I'm fixed, and mostly immune to all that nonsense.

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    1. I am really grateful that I grew up when I did - life was innocent then, and I was fortunate enough to grow up in a happy family situation too.

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    2. Having read some of the hospital doctors reports coming out of Italy in the last couple of days where ordinary healthy 20 to 50 years olds are turning up requiring oxygen to breathe this is a serious virus and one you should avoid getting at all costs, if possible. Thought I'd mention that before it spreads widely here to give people a chance to stock up with pasta, rice, porridge, medicines etc. I certainly intend to limit my time in busy public places like buses, trains, and shops over the next month or so and avoid contact with others,if possible, just in case. Best to be careful around the unknown, which this virus still is. No panic just sensible precautions.
      Best wishes and good luck.

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  15. Good tosee colour in your garden in spite of the deer. First case of Corona virus here (isolated in Auckland Hospital) and Auckland supermarkets are running short after panic buying.

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    1. I think that panic buying is not the way to go, this virus could be around for at least another year! They say that it could subside in the warmer weather but that does not appear to ring true in warmer places such as Tenerife.

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  16. Dear Rosemary, my first step into blog-land again - just looking... And yours is the first article I read - thank you!
    Here in Germany they are on the verge of hysteria too (they stopped a train because someone coughed :-) - and one town in NRW they have "closed", whatever that means.)
    On the other hand you cannot buy protection masks since 2 months (they tell you that those do not work - only for people in hospital they work, because they come so near to sick people - ideally we others should stand 2 meters aside - hahaha, tell us that again in the tube!).
    What annoys me is that they are not able to produce a little sheet of paper with two strings on it - and on the other hand they boast that they can manage a pan-epidemy. Aha.
    I think that caution is ok - but Berlin is a bit empty, as some shelves in the supermarket.
    Let's take a deep breath (with 2 m distance between us, hahaha) - and wait patiently, with as much foresight as possible, but also a cool head and a warm heart. Best wishes to you - Britta

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    1. It is so wonderful to hear from you again Britta but I do realise that you must have been very busy with all of your lovely new grandchildren - they must be an absolute joy.
      I like your amusing take on the current situation in Berlin - my feelings are that this world of our has gone a little bit crazy and much more panic stricken than it has ever been before.
      Hopefully one of these days life will return back to something more normal, one can always live in hope, but until then we all have to soldier on with whatever life decides to throw at us.

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  17. Here in Milan in spite of what is told constantly in the news , people are now quite relaxed about the corona virus , but the first days of the information about the virus supermarkets were ripped of almost anything, and streets were rather empty . Quite unreal actually , but you get to find a place to sit in the metro :-))

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    1. Good that you can now sit on the metro, sounds more like the good old days.
      It sounds as if the Italians in general take a more relaxed approach to these things until it actually becomes a reality.

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  18. I am a little late to the conversation, and the corona story changes by the day. There are now about 30 cases in Australia, and we are told it is inevitable it will spread. However, you cannot stock everything in your own home, and I don't really know what to do or buy. I have made sure we have plenty of sanitizing products because our daughter and children are coming over from Canada to visit. But when I went to the supermarket today, I was amazed by lots of empty shelves, particularly toilet paper, and porridge. It is interesting to read all the other commentators, and to note the same thing is happening all over the world. How pretty to have a snowfall, even just one for the season.

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    1. I have a small stack of toilet rolls now, and also two big bags of porridge - just in case, however, the shelves where I shopped were as full as normal.
      I am really pleased for you to learn that your Canadian family are arriving soon, that is very exciting for you all.

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  19. Hi Rosemary,
    Here in Portugal, 2 confirmed cases emerged yesterday. As other commentators have said before, people's hysteria and ignorance can be as terrible as the virus itself.
    I think the important thing is to follow the advice given by health services and try to be rational and responsible.
    Your garden is so beautiful, I especially loved the bush, it's spectacular.
    Greetings

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    1. Thanks Maria - things are moving on much quicker than I anticipated when I wrote this post, but you are right best to follow the advice given by health services and endeavour to be sensible.
      I am pleased that you enjoyed seeing a tiny glimpse of the garden, it gives us lots of pleasure now that it has started to flower again - roll on the summer weather.

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  20. I wholeheartedly agree with your thoughts Rosemary. We were discussing it earlier today. I'm not a "bury my head in the sand" person but I just don't want to hear any more reports. As Maria said ignorance and hysteria are dangerous. Your pots look lovely.

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    1. Thanks Polly - I understand that there are now 53 cases in the UK, but it is important to take into account that there are over 66 million people living in the UK.

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  21. I am not listening to local news on the subject. I am just preparing. Main thing I did is stock up on meds that we have to have. My husband cannot be without his blood thinner. This I hope will die down with warm weather coming. Of course it will probably be replaced by some other sensational news that they will bombard us with..

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    1. There are nearly 8 billion people live in the world, and currently the amount of people with the virus number in the low thousands.

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    1. The time to panic is "if you get it" and I suspect that on the whole, most people wont.

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  23. Hello, Rosemary!

    In an hour I will be meeting my daughter to attend a classical concert in a venue that at most probably only holds 500 people. We will not expect there to be a full house and we have already decided to not sit near other people which should not be a problem. I have been adding to my food stockpile for some time now as here in the Northwest U.S. we should be preparing for the Cascadia Earthquake which is 50 - some years already overdue. Each grocery trip I try to find something that can stay on the shelf (a lot of canned items/biscuits and pasta. I have already planned for the water for me and my cat (#1 priority). We have only had 4 confirmed cases of coronavirus here in Oregon and they are over 100 miles from me - both north and south. My preparations are to stay away from anyone who exhibits coughing/sneezing/runny noses and immediately wash my hands for at least 20 seconds if that should happen. As I read your response up above, there are worse things in this world that can happen and I certainly don't let them change my life. I would heartily buy a beautiful blue pot like you have or even that varied green one! Gorgeous! Deer live in my neck of the woods, too. I just refuse to feed them so as you have chosen heather I have chosen lavender, russian sage and kerria japonica - oh, also periwinkle for a ground cover none of which the deer choose to eat. On a late program last night a medical person said Fake News about the warmer weather causing the virus to subside. According to her and other specialists I've listened to, "we really haven't had the opportunity to follow the habits of this virus and the likelihood of it disappearing when the weather changes is highly suspect." So...we continue on with normal reactions to our own health about washing our hands, staying home when we're sick, and hopefully others will follow the same recommendations. As you quoted with the total population, the percentage of victims is still very small in comparison.

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    1. Hello Mary - it is really lovely to hear from you, and to know that all is well with you.
      We have just been away for a few days, and saw absolutely no panic at all - people were wandering around enjoying the sunshine and walking with their families in the hills. The hotel where we stayed was simply carrying on as normal - it was refreshing to see, and did us both a world of good. Hope you enjoyed your concert with your daughter.

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  24. Dear Rosemary - Japan is holding up so far with various methods to slow down the speed of the viruses spreading, which helps medical system work well. Rolls of toilet papers and boxes of tissue papers have gone from the shelves of the market temporally, but soon appeared again after the news made people feel assured that they are domestically manufactured enough. As to myself and my family, we can be calm and collected as we have stocked things to prepare for large scale of earthquake. I can’t deny kind of a sinking mood now but we are fortunate to be able to stroll around this residential area with many wonderful parks. Life continues with utmost caution and care while the changing nature consoles us. Poor irises in the pot in your garden. Daffodils must have been safe due to the toxic agents. Take care.

    Yoko

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    1. Dear Yoko - so pleased to learn that all seem to be going slowly with you re: the virus in your area. Here too, things appear calm at the moment. Our shop shelves are stacked up as per normal, and we have had no trouble finding hand sanitiser gel to carry around in our pockets. We have just been away for a short break, and everyone was out enjoying the sunshine, seemingly without a care in the world. However, a few more days or weeks and things could change dramatically, but until that happens let's all remain optimistic but cautious.

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