Tuesday, 28 April 2020

To Woods....

Make haste if you wish to see Bluebells this year; in my area they are already past their peak - far earlier than normal.
However, whilst wandering through the wood, I was lucky enough to spot some prime specimens of Early Purple Orchids, which were much taller, and more elegant than the shorter, stubbly ones, found on our Common.
I make a point of visiting our local bluebell wood every year as I recall the words that A E Housman wrote in A Shropshire Lad, in his case regarding seeing the Cherry blossom;
******
Now, of my threescore years and ten,
Twenty will not come again,
And take from seventy springs a score, 
It only leaves me fifty more.
*****
Unlike Housman I do not have fifty more, so every year is a bonus.


45 comments:

  1. Hello Rosemary, Your woods seem remarkably consistent. When I used to roam the spring woods in Ohio, I noticed vast differences each year. Some plants that previously had formed carpets virtually disappeared, while sometimes rare plants had an abundant year. Nature is full of surprises, but I suspect that the mass disappearances have more to do with pollution and manipulation of the environment--drain a lake a mile away, and a distant bed of perhaps violets or bloodroot may vanish.
    --Jim
    p.s. The good news is that the dandelions have come back to eastern Cleveland. I had noticed in the last few years almost no dandelions, but my sister reports that this Spring they are back in full force.

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    1. Hello Jim - I cannot imagine dandelions ever disappearing from here as they are extremely prolific. However, I would certainly miss them should they did disappear, but having said that, I do not want them in my garden.

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  2. Oh wow, how pretty. I love the smell of bluebells. They remind me of my childhood spent in Wales. Everything seems to be coming a little earlier this year.

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    1. It is good that you still remember them from childhood and that they bring back memories of your time in Wales. I too vividly remember from my childhood days as well.

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  3. Your bluebell woods are much more mature than the one I visit. It looks amazing.

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    1. These bluebells were taken yesterday evening, and although it is not obvious, they were actually already dying.

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    2. I meant the trees are more mature really. When I visited my wood last week, the bluebells were beginning to turn.

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  4. Wonderful colours in the grass, thanks for sharing.

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    1. Mother Nature seems to disagree, and so do I, that blue and green should never be seen together.

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  5. Like you every year is a bonus :)
    Love captures Rosemary of the flowers.
    Take care.

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    1. Glad you enjoyed seeing them Margaret - thank goodness that turn up every year.

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  6. I have many a time tromped through bluebell woods in Britain, and in all my experiences of nature throughout the world, it ranks in the very top echelon. It is hard to beat the sheer joy of the profusion of colour and the bird song. Thanks for bringing back memories of something I will almost certainly never experience again.

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    1. I took these yesterday David, accompanied throughout the walk by the birds evening chorus which was a delight.

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  7. How beautiful! It is a sight I have never seen in person.

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    1. I would hope that one day you might visit one Catherine - to walk in a bluebell wood, is to witness one of Mother Natures magical moments.

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  8. Dear Rosemary,
    There is nothing prettier than green and blue together.

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    1. Dear Gina - I love the wonderful blue shade of the bluebell flowers offset by the zingy chartreuse green shades of the Beech leaves - whoever, coined the quote that 'blue and green should never be seen together' didn't ever walk in a bluebell wood!!!

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  9. So beautiful, refreshing for the eyes.

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  10. It looks as though I shall miss out on the bluebells this year as there are very few within walking distance of home. So thank you for sharing your bluebells here.

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    1. I am sad to learn that you do not have a bluebell wood within walking distance John because I know how I would feel if I was in the same situation. You must make up for it next year.

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  11. Dearest Rosemary,
    Wish we would have such a magic blue haze in our area. Never seen any here in Georgia.
    The Early purple orchid is also a charm!
    Great photos and glad you could enjoy them once again.
    Hugs,
    Mariette

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    1. Dear Mariette - it is my understanding that our local bluebells - Hyacinthoides non-scripta do not grow in the States, but that the Spanish bluebells - Hyacinthoides hispanica do grow in parts of the States.
      The Spanish ones that grow here are in fact a menace and threat to our native ones as they are more vigorous and given the chance will hybridise with them and change their genetic makeup thus diluting their characteristics, weakening them and potentially evolving into something else.
      I was thrilled to find so many lovely Early Purple Orchids.

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    2. Dearest Rosemary,
      We do have the Spanish bluebells: https://mariettesbacktobasics.blogspot.com/2011/04/scilla-campanulata-spanish-blue-bells.html
      Also these wood hyacinths but they are light in color: https://mariettesbacktobasics.blogspot.com/2011/04/hyacinthoides-hispanica-excelsior.html
      Your Early Purple Orchids are a treasure!
      ENJOY

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  12. With spring all nature is reborn and flourishes. What beautiful flowers, wonderfully captured. Thank you for coloring our look.
    All the best

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  13. I miss not being able to see wildflowers in the Spring (or any other part of the year). I grew up in a rural area and was surrounded by them as a child.

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  14. Lovely photos. I have a garden full of bluebells but they have yet to appear so we are weeks behind you. Also it's not rained here for almost a month, unusual for April.

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    1. No rain here either Bob except for yesterday which was very welcome as the soil is like concrete.

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  15. Oh, those bluebells are wonderful and bring back lots of memories.

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  16. how lucky to see an orchid like this, so beautiful, I have only ever seen one growing wild in 25 years and not this lovely purple colour - I bet you were excited to find it.

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    1. I was really pleased to see such lovely specimens - there were at least a dozen of them flowering together.
      We have loads of them growing on the Common around our home throughout the whole year - at least 20 different varieties.

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  17. It is always a treat to see your fabulous bluebells Rosemary. And with the purple orchids as well, the sight must be glorious. How heavenly to see that on a rambling walk.

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    1. You may recall that I took Australian blogger, Wendy, to a local bluebell wood two years ago, and that was around the end of the first week in May and then they were just coming into their own. This year they will be completely finished by the end of this week.
      There was such a lovely clump of these Early Purple Orchids and they were so tall and such a wonderful shade of purple. The ones that grow on our Common are paler, which I suspect is mainly due to the fact that they do not have a tree canopy overhead.

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  18. Have never seen a bluebell woods (and probably won't this lifetime.) But I did see an alpine meadow once in Glacier National Park in the Rockies...so I dream of summersaulting in the wildflowers...a daydream that's very pleasant.

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    1. Alpine meadows are beautiful - I have been in them too in Austria, Switzerland, and Italy. Hope you get to fulfil you dream one day.

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  19. Very interesting post. Your blog has very cool content <3
    I am following you and invite you to me
    https://milentry-blog.blogspot.com

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    1. Thanks for visiting and commenting Milentry.

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  20. I too would definitely go for a walk in the wood to see this glorious sight every year of my life if I were lucky enough to have a bluebell wood nearby !

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    1. Housman's words are so true - time is of the essence. Hope all is well with you.

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  21. Dearest Rosemary - I read this when you published and because I was overwhelmed by homesickness - for true English bluebell woods - I forgot to write a comment!!! Sorry dear. These woodland scenes are so beautiful - and the orchid just a lovely extra. Yes, the years are fleeting and I'm wondering how many Springtimes I will be blessed with. This one, despite the circumstances brought by the virus, is actually the loveliest I can recall in this area - I'm enjoying it so much!

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    1. Dear Mary - it has been the same here. We have had no rain during the whole of April, and the sun has shone during the month more than at any other time ever, according to records. I can't help thinking that it is all to do with the lack of vehicles on the roads, planes in the sky and factories billowing out their various toxic fumes.

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