Friday, 13 May 2022

May's Magical Moments in our Garden

Paeonia lutea ludlowii - yellow peony tree

This tree is named in honour of Frank Ludlow, a British Naturalist. He discovered this tree whilst on an expedition through the Tsangpo Valley in Eastern Tibet during 1936. Before this date the tree was completely unknown in the West. It has very large black shiny seeds which it sheds around the base of the tree. We must have grown at least 20 trees from them which have all been given to friends who tell us how much they enjoy them.
This luscious red peony tree is our pride and joy - Paeonia delavayi, named after Father Jean Marie Delavay, a French Catholic missionary in China, who collected plants. It is endemic to southwestern China, where it is limited to Sichuan, Yunnan and the very South-East of Tibet. It does not produce bountiful seeds like the yellow tree but is much rarer. It is listed as endangered by the China Plant Red Data Book where it is under threat. This is as a result of the people digging out its roots for medicine on a scale that is not adequately controlled.
This a Lutea Hybrid Tree Peony - Paeonia 'Alhambra'. We had a similar one in ballerina pink, but the deer have trampled on it and smashed it into smithereens.
This shrub hails from the
Himalayas - Piptanthus nepalennsis - Nepal Laburnam. It has lovely very dark green shiny stems which gradually turn black and thus form a stunning contrast with its citrus yellow pea like flowers.
We have given the small walled garden a bit of a revamp this Spring. It used to have lots of ornamental grasses which had become rather thuggish, so they have been removed. For the moment we have filled the cleared beds with cheap and cheerful pansies.
Lots of Alliums adding splashes of purple all around the garden.

The Cercis siliquastrum - Judas Tree - with its pretty heart shaped leaves is looking a picture. I want it to stay just as it is for as long as possible, but I know the blossom will drop before I am ready to let it go.
I have brought a small branch of the Judas Tree into the kitchen so that we can continue to admire it whilst indoors.

34 comments:

  1. I think that cheap and cheerful describes pansies to a tee!

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    1. The two beds of pansies were a give away price but they are bringing us some colourful pleasure.

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  2. I would love to sit on that stone bench by the round window in your garden and just soak up the sun, flowers and fragrance!

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  3. Wonderful blossoming trees! You have some real rare beauties there. Enjoy them!

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    1. We have planted many special plants across the years - sadly some have flourished but others have not.

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  4. Your peony trees are beautiful, with such interesting histories. How I love your walled garden with that warm Cotswold stone. I'm sure the stone creates a bit of a mini-climate that is warm and protected. Pansies are such cheerful and cooperative plants, filling in, blooming long, and making everyone smile.

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    1. That area of the garden is a lovely place to sit and contemplate in the sunshine.

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  5. It's all looking lovely, Rosemary. Your garden is just beautiful. And that red of your precious peony tree is simply luscious!

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    1. I have rarely seen the red peony tree for sale or in other gardens. We were particularly fortunate to find the plant in a specialised garden that we once visited in Scotland.

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  6. What a wonderful selection of plants. I have just planted a couple of punnets of pansies in the front of our front border.

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    1. The pansies were purchased on the spur of the moment - they were really cheap and came in such pretty colours. I hope you enjoy yours.

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  7. All very lovely and the Judas tree is a lovely colour. Grasses can become tiresome after awhile, the pansies will be pretty as they do have sweet faces.

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    1. The grasses were lovely at first, but eventually they started to overwhelm the whole area.

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  8. Fabulous photos . Your garden is looking wonderful.

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  9. our judas tree is beautiful it was lovely to see all of your garden :)

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    1. I love Judas trees - was yours already in your garden or did you plant it? It is not an easy tree to discover in the average garden centre.
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  10. That's a beautiful garden, of which you should be immensely proud. Years ago I remember reading some books about the plant hunters who searched every corner of the globe for unusual plants - fascinating stuff.

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    1. At times it keeps us very busy, especially now when the Box hedges need cutting.
      There were some interesting plant hunters - have you read about Marianne North? During the mid 1800s she travelled to many remote corners all around the world. She spent a year living in the depths of the Amazon forest in Brazil painting all of the tropical flowers. She was a plant hunter, but she only painted them. Her wonderful collection of paintings are now in the hands of Kew Garden who have a gallery devoted to her exquisite work. She did not need to sell her work as she was very wealthy.

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  11. Beautiful flowers! Your garden is amazing!

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  12. Your garden is bursting with color. I like all of the stone work too. The ones standing up along the stone wall are interesting.

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    1. It is a beautiful time of year for all of our gardens.

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    1. We do feel blessed that some of the rarer trees have managed to survive well with us - thank you.

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  14. Your garden is magical, Rosemary, indeed! I like your arrangement of Judas branch in the kitchen. Good for you that you can admire both flowers and the lovely heart leaves at the same time. As to the similar tree in Japan, Cercis chinensis, nearly round leaves appear after purplish pink flowers.

    Yoko

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    1. We have Cercis chinensis here too Yoko - I understand that there are about 6 different varieties of Cercis tree, all quite similar but with just slight variations in their colour and leaves.

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  15. Wow! Your garden is just amazing!!! Full of inspiration...
    Always so nice visiting your blog Rosemary :)
    Titti

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    1. Dear Titti - thank you for your kind comment - it is always lovely to have a visit from you - thank you.

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  16. Amazing garden but it must take a lot of effort to keep it that way. In my own garden, having planted loads of seeds this year it's a constant battle against slugs, snails, squirrels, mice, and even birds trampling or eating my young plants to the extent that each large pot looks like a maximum security prison with an overhead latticework of protective sticks to save them. And that's without any rabbits and deer. I clear weeds in my neighbours garden and it's a never-ending process each summer.

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    1. Our biggest problem tends to be deer. We place objects at various entrances as a deterrent in the hope that they will not enter certain parts of the garden and gobble up our flowers - not the leaves or stem just the flowers. We now make a concerted effort to check whether the flowers we plant are to their liking or not.

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  17. Dear Rosemary,
    Your walled Garden is my most favorite garden in all the world. So harmoneous and so very beautiful.

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    1. Dear Gina - thank you for your really generous comment - coming from someone who has such a very beautiful garden yourself I am overwhelmedX

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― A.A. Milne, Winnie-the-Pooh