Monday, 20 October 2014

Nertera granadensis

Spotted in the florists, a Nertera granadensis, coral bead plant, pin cushion plant, a little jewel that to me is irresistible, so home it came
I rarely see them for sale, and I am hopeless at keeping them alive. I will just enjoy it for as long as it manages to survive. Looking after them is difficult and not recommended for beginners, perhaps having owned a few over the years I am now no longer a beginner? It should be kept in a bright but semi shaded position. A south facing window is ideal, but without direct sunlight
I dont know why I like it so much, its a curious plant - all those tiny orange succulent beads scattered amongst such diminutive leaves
It is a ground covering plant and has an unusually extensive transcontinental distribution surrounding the Pacific Ocean. I would love to see it growing naturally.
It should be allowed to dry out in the autumn and winter, but kept moist in the spring and summer. I had previously imagined that it required moisture all year round. Armed with some new facts - fingers crossed, it will be around for a long time.

66 comments:

  1. Dear Rosemary,
    lovely - but I also never managed to keep it for long, and have never seen it 'in nature' - meaning: in a garden instead of a pot. But it looks very cheery!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think that it just grows in the wild in certain regions Britta - I always imagined that it should be kept moist all of the time because the little beads are so succulent looking, but that is not the case. I think that my previous ones have died from over watering.

      Delete
  2. Bom dia, desconhecia totalmente a planta que partilha, gostava de possuir a mesma, vou procurar para obter, as fotos são lindas pelas variadas e lindas cores.
    AG
    http://momentosagomes-ag.blogspot.pt/

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you for your visit and comment

      Delete
  3. I have never seen such a plant before, hope you will succeed in having him so bright coloured.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Apparently they do have flowers before they have these little orange bead pods - I have never seen them in flower.

      Delete
  4. What a unique and fantastic plant, Rosemary. The little succulents look like tiny tomatoes to me. I would find it irresistible too, but have never seen it here, in a garden or a plant nursery. Perhaps it belongs to another part of the Pacific.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The beads look a little bigger on my photos than they are in real life Patricia because I used macro to photograph them. Apparently they grow in Eastern Australia only. They must look magnificent when they coat a whole area of ground. Both the orange colour and the green are very vivid.

      Delete
  5. Such an unusual, beautiful plant! Here's hoping you have success with this one :-)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Keeping my fingers crossed especially now I know some of its likes and dislikes.

      Delete
  6. I've never seen this plant either. It looks like a ground covering version of my Cotoneaster that's currently covered in the same orange beady berries. It does look pretty in your pots. Good luck. P x

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. My photos probably make it look larger than it is Patricia - this plant is the equivalent of one of those small containers of mustard and cress for sandwiches.

      Delete
  7. I've never seen nor heard of this plant before and it's such a little beauty, guess I'll have to do some research.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It is surprising how few people seem to have seen or heard of it. I have only ever found the plant a few times.

      Delete
  8. Hello Rosemary, What an unusual plant. I'm sure that if anyone can get it to prosper, you can. I tried to look up Nertera granadensis on the internet, and most of the photos were of potted plants. The few that were growing in nature, the berries seemed much sparser, although I might prefer it that way. Several sources said that it grew wild in Taiwan, so I will have to keep an eye out for it.
    --Jim

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello Jim - I too read that it grew wild in Taiwan, and I was hopeful that you might be able to throw a bit of light on it for me. At least, with the help of the internet, I do now know more about its likes and dislikes.

      Delete
    2. Hi again, I found these images of the wild plant in Taiwan: http://www.flickriver.com/photos/mingiweng/tags/rubiaceae/
      The leaves and fruit seem in a more natural proportion, so perhaps it is easy to walk by without taking special note of it. --Jim

      Delete
    3. Thank you very much for doing that Jim - in the wild it looks nothing like I had imagined. I had thought it would look like a blanket of orange similar to a covering of moss.

      Delete
  9. How weird is that. I thought it was a tomato plant on first sight. So unusual but very colourful and no I haver heard of it either.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. So far only one other person has ever seen it before - it really is an unusual tiny little plant.

      Delete
  10. She's a little beauty ! Hope you will succed with this one :) Wishes for a good week, Rosemary !

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ooops :) Sorry ! Succeed ...

      Delete
    2. Thanks to the internet I now know what she likes to survive so I am more hopeful.

      Delete
  11. Widziałam tą roślinę gdzieś w ogrodniczych sklepach , ślicznie wygląda , ale pewnie też bym ją zmarnowała.
    Pozdrawiam

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Cieszę się, że widziałem ten mały zakład, a także - większość ludzi nigdy nie widziałem go wcześniej.

      Delete
  12. I had one many years ago and for memory it didn't last long either. I am usually guilty of overwatering so that was probably the reason. I love the shape of the pot you have it in too.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Now that I know more about its likes and dislikes it will be interesting to see how long I can keep it going for Jessica. The pot was given to me by my grandson many years ago - I seem to recall that he put a cactus in it for me.

      Delete
  13. Ι thought it was a miniature of berries or mini tomatoes but it's a decorative plant. Very unsuual I admit but gloogling its name, I found that it's a midly poisonous plant so care should be taken as you have your grand children at home. I don't know if you also have pets Rosemary. Anyway, it's really a beautiful and impressive plant.
    Happy week!
    Olympia

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The little orange beads are a bit like berries, and I imagine that they have seeds inside. It makes quite a colourful impact for such a tiny plant.
      Thank you for the information about it being mildly poisonous, I will bear that in mind.

      Delete
  14. Wow, I have never seen a plant like this before! It almost looks like a lot of cotoneaster berries all sitting on top of a pot at first glance. I love that you have kept trying to grow these learning more as you go. I hope that this time you have all the knowledge to keep them going for a long time. xx

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Fingers crossed Amy that I will. I expect that you do not see them often because they must be just as difficult for the florists and garden centres to keep them alive too.

      Delete
  15. I've never seen such a plant before! Damn sure it wouldn't grow in Canada.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think that this little bead plant is a law unto itself, but we shall see if I can crack it.

      Delete
  16. It is a real long time ago that I saw this plant, but I never had it myself. I think when I should come across this plant I should buy it too, it looks lovely and worthwhile the trial to overwinter.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think that you like unusual plants too Janneke - I seldom see this plant so when I do I usually purchase one. I am hopeful that now I have read all about it that I might be able to keep it for a bit longer than previously.

      Delete
  17. Dear Rosemary,

    I hope your nertera granadensis survives and thrives. I've never seen a plant like this one, but if I happened upon it, I would find it irresistible, too. I am intrigued that this is a ground cover, which implies that it can cover large areas. That would be a delight to see!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dear Mark - I imagine too that it must be really attractive to see in its natural habitat - it is such a fussy little plant - fingers crossed that I can keep it happy.

      Delete
  18. I had one of these in my room when I was a girl. I can remember it being very popular. It brings back many sweet memories :-)

    Have a lovely week!

    Madelief x

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ah! that is so lovely Madelief - I can imagine that a young girl would enjoy having one in her room - glad it brought back sweet memories for you.

      Delete
  19. It's very lovely. Good luck with it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I am always hopeful Margaret - thanks.

      Delete
  20. The plant looks deliciously pretty! Too bad the berries aren't edible. I wonder why this kind of plant produces such delicious looking fruits and yet they aren't edible? I wonder what's the logic behind, in terms of plant ecology.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This little plant is a complete mystery to me - even just getting it to survive.

      Delete
  21. I can see why you like this plant :) my mouth was watering just looking at its vibrant colour, like a bowl full of tiny cherry tomatoes. I hope this one decides to stay and enjoy all the love and attention you give it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I am not normally an 'orange' person but this plant in a room adds a touch of brightness and seems appropriate for the season.

      Delete
  22. That looks wonderful - to start with I thought it was a bowl piled with berries and small leaves. I see it is native to New Zealand but I had never seen or heard of it before and can see no mention of it being for sale here.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, Susan, you are right, I read that one of its habitats is New Zealand. Perhaps because it is hardly ever seen in Plant Centres or Florists that adds to its curiosity. Apparently it has insignificant little white flowers before they turn into orange berries.

      Delete
  23. I love this plant, but indeed you don't see it on sale very often, probably due to the difficulty in growing it here. Almost looks like a Buxus filled with small berries .

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I suspect that its rarity value adds to its charm. They are inexpensive to buy when you do happen to come across them.

      Delete
  24. Dear Rosemary, I love your little plant and I also love the pots they are in. Often we try even harder to grow a certain plant because they are such a challenge. This time around you might even accomplish it. If anyone can, you can.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dear Gina - lovely to hear from you, and delighted to learn that you have enjoyed such a wonderful trip to Europe.
      Now that I know more about the secret life of this little plant, I am more hopeful that I might succeed.

      Delete
  25. Well I never!
    I have never seen anything like that...no wonder you had to have another!
    Keep us posted on its performance...
    Have a great week...
    Cheers!
    Linda :o)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I can only assume that you do not see this little jewel for sale very often because the Garden Centres and Florists have the same problems keeping them alive too.

      Delete
  26. How delightful & interesting too. For a moment I thought you were going to treat us to a new recipe for miniature tomatoes!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It fits in well with halloween colours which are nearly upon us.

      Delete
  27. Definitely a new one to me Rosemary - I thought they were very mini cherry tomatoes at first glance!
    I can imagine how stunning they would be as ground cover - perhaps I need to plan another trip to the ocean on the other side if you think they love the Pacific rather than the Atlantic!

    Hugs - Mary

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dear Mary - they are very picky about their habitat - sadly definitely the Pacific and not the Atlantic

      Delete
  28. It's a beautiful one Rosemary. I love the color at this time of the year.
    Have a wonderful day.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Their colour fits in with the current autumnal and halloween season

      Delete
  29. It is an extraordinary plant isn't it? I love it! But just like you I was never able to keep it for long. Haven't had one for years now. Maybe I should try it again with your tips. I wish you a lot of success this time and hope you'll be able to keep it for a long time. You will let us know won't you? Wouldn't it be wonderful to see this plant growing naturally indeed.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I imagine that it grows rather like moss, but of course I cannot be sure. I shall try to keep it going but I suspect that it will go the same way as others that I have tried.

      Delete
  30. To see the first image, I thought mini tomatoes are still harvested in your place. Nertera granadensis is new to me. I think I know why you love them, rosemary, and these photos show how you love them. The berries are so beautiful and ornamental. I simply wonder how the flowers are. I hope they will live long for you.

    Yoko.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dear Yoko - apparently it has little white flowers which are very nondescript - I wonder if I can keep it going until they start to arrive. The orange bead like berries will eventually turn black.

      Delete
  31. I too have never come across this lovely plant. It looks so unusual and reminds me of a big bowl of cherries. Hope it will last longer than your previous with the new caring instructions. Sarah x

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Fingers crossed Sarah - I think perhaps my photos do not show just how tiny these little orange bead style berries are.

      Delete

❖PLEASE NOTE❖ Comments made by those who hide their identity will be deleted

“You can't stay in your corner of the forest waiting for others to come to you - you have to go to them sometimes”
― A.A. Milne, Winnie-the-Pooh