Saturday, 12 August 2017

Hinton Ampner Gardens

The gardens at Hinton Ampner, Hampshire, were the creation of one man, Ralph Dutton, 8th Lord Sherborne. They are widely acknowldged as being a masterpiece of 20th century garden design with mixed formal and informal planting and fine vistas throughout.

In the Walled Garden

The flowers were showing off their August colours


















and there was a bountiful display of fruit and vegetables too



















'All Saints' - the parish church, shares a common boundary with the garden. It was built from flint with stone corners in the C13th but on the foundations of an earlier Saxon church. 
The pretty timber bell chamber is typical of small churches in this area of the country.
Lily pond
'One man and his dog'
Crinum powellii - giant swamp lily

Ralph Dutton inherited the house in 1935 and rebuilt it in 1960 following a devastating fire. He seamlessly blended the grandeur of this Georgian classical house with the elegant gardens and parkland which frame it.
The Sunken Garden




  Agapanthus africanus

37 comments:

  1. So glad to be back here to enjoy your wonderful photos. Hinton Ampner Gardens are completely unknown to me but so very beautiful. The sunken garden, the walled garden it's all very nice and well maintained, love it. The house is beautiful too, especially in the way it's decorated with climbers on the walls, but most sweet creation in this garden is 'One Man and his Dog'.
    Regards, Janneke

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    1. I am really, really happy that you are back too Janneke♡

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  2. Dear Rosemary - such a dream of a garden! (And of a house - so beautiful!) I am glad the house could be reconstructed after the fire - and the garden: a MUST on my "To-Visit- List". Thank you! Brittany

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    1. Dear Britta - I do hope that one day you will have the opportunity to visit this inspirational garden

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  3. The gardens are just beautiful. Your posts always send me off wanting more. ;-) I had to look at it on Google Earth to see exactly where it is. It is huge!

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    1. That is very interesting Catherine - I have never actually looked on Google Earth, only Google Maps with the satellite views - I must give it a try.

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  4. Oh to have time and money to grow a garden like that. I dream of having a walled garden.

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    1. I have a small Cotwold stone walled garden which we both enjoy, and love to sit in during summer months.

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  5. Dear Rosemary, The sunken garden is a masterpiece. I love the way you took that long shot. I can appreciate its beauty without being envious. However, I would love to experience this arden in person.

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    1. I loved the sunken garden Gina - it was my favourite area. I especially like the restrained use of the shocking pink dahlia colour which made a real impact.

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  6. What a lovely and interesting place Rosemary. I too love the Sunken Garden, especially the pink and grey combination against the greenery - just gorgeous. The bell tower of the church is pretty indeed and the church looks wonderful viewed through the garden. I know I would love to visit here too.

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    1. The whole setting Patricia makes for a very calming and tranquil garden to visit. The sunken garden is a lovely surprise when you suddenly come across it.

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  7. WOW! I would love to visit this garden...
    Have a happy sunday!
    Warm hug from Titti

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    1. Wish you could visit one day Titti - hope that your weekend has been happy and filled with lots of sunshine♡

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  8. I love places like this and your professionally composed photographs do it justice.

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    1. It was a lovely place to visit Bob

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  9. The sunken garden is amazing. I can't imagine the amount of gardening it took ...and takes to make it look so,perfect.

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    1. Yes, for me, the Sunken Garden was definitely the pièce de résistance.

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  10. OMG Rosemary - where to start and tell you how fabulous these photos are of such a place! The sunken garden, sigh, the absolutely amazing closeups of gorgeous flowers, and the so whimsical 'one man and his dog' tucked into the nasturtiums. All just splendid around that stunning Georgian house!

    Hope summertime surrounds you with good weather and fun days dear friend.
    Hugs - Mary

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    1. Glad that you enjoyed seeing this garden Mary - it wasn't our intention to visit but passed by the entrance on our way to another NT property and had a change of mind.
      Today is a pretty awful summers day, but fortunately there have been plenty of very good days too.
      It sounds as if this summertime is very hot with you Mary♡

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  11. what a beautiful place to visit, lots of colour for August! xxx

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    1. We are pleased that we passed by and suddenly saw the entrance to the garden - it was a lucky find.

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  12. You've just given me an excuse to hire a car next time I'm with my mother in Hampshire

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    1. It would make a lovely trip for yourself and mother.

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  13. Hello Rosemary, I am intrigued by that wooden belfry. Too bad that the house was so badly damaged by fire, but I am happy over the decision to restore rather than replace.
    --Jim

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    1. Hello Jim - it is interesting the way different styles of architecture have arisen regarding church development across the country. In Surrey, where my husband comes from, they tend to have wooden belfries too, but totally different from these Hampshire designs.

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  14. Another wonderful garden! I particularly love the view towards the church. Sarah x

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    1. The church is a particularly lovely enhancement at the edge of the garden.

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  15. Dear Rosemary,

    Always lovely to come and see what you have to share and what amazing photos you have shown of the wonderful garden and home. The stone wall gives such privacy and makes it like a secret garden.
    Hope you are enjoying the week
    hugs
    Carolyn

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    1. Glad that you enjoyed seeing this lovely garden Carolyn - hope all is well with you and that you are delighted with your new kitchen.

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  16. Hello Rosemary, This is a beautiful garden and what a perfect day for you to visit too. I just love the Agapanthus africanus.
    Helen

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    1. Dear Helen - hope all is well with you - I love Agapanthus too, such a wonderful shade of blue.

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  17. Dearest Rosemary,
    You absolutely were there at the Hinton Ampner garden's peak time of colors!
    Stunning photos of the variety you show us.
    How majestic All Saints Church looks in the landscape and also the rebuilt house. Quite an asset and let's hope they can keep it up.
    Hugs and happy weekend.
    Mariette

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    1. Dear Mariette - the house and gardens now belong to the National Trust so they will be safe forever, and kept beautifully maintained.
      It was an unexpected visit for us as we just happened on the entrance gate as we were driving along the road, but a happy chance encounter.

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  18. Beautiful, Rosemary! Stunning colour - stunning photos. I have never visited, but I DID used to cycle not far away when I was a pimply teenager - probably trying to escape gardening duty at home, actually...

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    1. Does that make you a Hampshire lad then Mike? My husband had one foot in Hampshire and one in Surrey as he was born right on the borders.

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