Tuesday, 2 April 2019

The Walk

It's early morning in a Devon valley. 

Birds twitter amongst a labyrinth of twigs in the newly manicured hedge.

The peace and quiet is suddenly shattered by the clattering sounds of a tractor trundling down the lane.
A mother and her lambs view us with curiosity.
A thousand year old barn 
with it's very own watchmen. They honk at us with a loud warning 'do not venture here'.
This Devon Longhouse was built in 825AD when it began life as a nunnery along with a small farm. It has traditional cob walls, a thatched roof and inglenook fireplaces. In 1086 it was one of nine small holdings mentioned in the Domesday Book as belonging to the Abbey of Buckfast in the Manor of Trusham. 
Here we stop and step inside, a hearty Devon breakfast awaits us.

44 comments:

  1. What a beautiful morning and such a wonderful place to enjoy breakfast! Those barns and Devon Longhouses are beautiful. They certainly built things to last in the 'old days' Today's new builds will be lucky if they stand even a 100 years!! Enjoy your day. Best, Jane x

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    1. We stayed at that inn for a few days, it made an enchanting break.

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  2. It looks a very rustique and nice place for a walk. Love the picture of the two geese, so cute!

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    1. The geese made a lot of noise, but I agree they do look cute.

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  3. Hello Rosemary, I always used to have a favorite walk, which never lost its points of interest, no matter how often repeated. In Taiwan I have discovered a number of interesting neighborhoods with lots of old and sometimes quaintly ruined buildings that were fascinating to walk by, but it seems that in the last few years the bulldozers have claimed most of them!
    --Jim

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    1. Hello Jim - it seems a shame that even in Taiwan quaintly ruined buildings have been bulldozed and destroyed. By the way I would love to see some of your local architecture!
      There was a period here, particularly during the 60s/70s when many historical properties were lost or destroyed to make way for modern trends, but not today. Properties are now listed and graded making it very difficult to even change or alter them.

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  4. And I am sure that you enjoyed your hearty Devon breakfast!

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    1. So hearty David that you couldn't eat it everyday - you would end up looking huge!

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  5. In Canada, we think that a building that has stood 100 years is OLD! lol. then we tear it down and build new.

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    1. I remember when my brother's mother-in-law came over from Canada, she couldn't get over the age of everything.

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  6. What a fabulous walk packed with fascinating buildings. There just are never enough pictures. :-) Which just means I enjoyed it very much!

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    1. Thank you Catherine - you are so generous with your comments - you have made my day.

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    2. Good heavens! Today (April 4th) England it getting snow. I hope your garden is OK.

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    3. It is still April 3rd here Catherine - I had heard that too, but so far everything remains the same. I will let you know if things change tomorrow - the weather is so fickle I can well believe that you could be rightX

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    4. It's wet and cold Catherine, no snow, but miserable.

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  7. Trying to make me homesick dear Rosemary? I'll never stop feeling homesick for Devon even after all these years!
    There's just no place like home.

    Glad the weather was great for your visit and you were able to get more wonderful photos. Looks like the lanes were recently given a 'haircut' - tractors were always tough to pass, lot of reversing required. The longhouse is awesome, especially the stained glass windows, and that ancient barn has, thankfully, been kept up with great thatch. The honking geese twins/pair are super cool, love the background of fallen petals.

    Hope Devon weather is kind in May also - I'm anxious for a good 'cream tea' - preferably in an outdoor tea room under a warm, sunny sky.
    Thanks for asking about Jasmin - she appears to be OK and hopefully has no residual discomfort from being hit so hard in the accident. Now the search for a replacement car starts!

    Mary XO

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    1. Happy that you enjoyed seeing 'your Devon' Mary - not long to go before you you will be there too.

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  8. Wow on that old barn. The stained glass is beautiful, and the mama and lambs are a sweet sight.

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    1. Glad you enjoyed seeing the old barn William.

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  9. The peace of the countryside is evident in every photo here, Rosemary, even to the clattering of the tractor. So lovely.
    I was stopped in my tracks by the more than 1000 year old building. Just amazing.

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    1. It feels as if time has stood still when wandering along these valleys, it gives a sense of all is well, even if it isn't!

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  10. Gorgeous county there, beautiful old buildings. Adore the old barn.

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    1. The barn was very picturesque with its pair of geese and flowers.

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  11. Devon looks lovely, Rosemary. Can't wait to see Cornwall again in May.

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    1. Not long to go before you will be over Betty.

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  12. A great part of the country that. Passed by that area on the Devon and Cornwall coastal footpath many years ago. Buckfast is a very popular evening tipple here in the Central Belt of Scotland. Probably it's best customer in the UK market.

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    1. I have never tried their wine - I believe that they call it a 'buckie' in Scotland.

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  13. Enchanting!
    Cheers!
    Linda :o)

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    1. Thanks for visiting Linda - glad that you enjoyed it.

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  14. The walk, the Inn - it all looks wonderful

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  15. Amazing barn. It reminds me of the police station at Studland Bay!

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    1. I looked online but sadly could not find an image of the police station.

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  16. I always think that I have picked out my favorite picture then I scroll down . You are amazing. That barn is very high on my list.

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    1. Thank you Janey - that is such a lovely comment which I very much appreciate. Glad that you enjoyed seeing the photos.

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  17. I enjoyed this walk very much Rosemary. Devon looks as delightful as I always imagined. Even the lambs look totally picturesque. The longhouse is very interesting to me, and an astonishing age to this Aussie girl. It would be much older than any building I have ever visited, an amazing place to have breakfast.

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    1. Delighted to have you along Patricia - we actually stayed in that longhouse for several days. It is an inn now.

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  18. Dearest Rosemary,
    Haha, those eyes of the honking watchmen!
    Love the long house, it is very well kept.
    The builders of that cob wall nunnery 825AD were way ahead of the GreenBuilding concept!
    Looking forward to read the next chapter...
    Hugs,
    Mariette

    PS Thanks for visiting my blog on BlogLoving!

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    1. Dear Mariette - I hadn't realised until I took that photo of the geese that they actually have 'teeth' running along the inside of their beaks. However, technically they are known as "tomia," not teeth.

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  19. Could anything be more idyllic ?......don't think so !

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    1. It made me feel that all was well in the world, even if it isn't.

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  20. Beautiful photos - the barn and the geese made MY day! :-)

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  21. What a lovely place! Are you on holiday?
    Wonderful to stay in a place that has survived for so long.

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