Thursday, 14 May 2020

Flower Quiz

Do you recognise this shrub with bright yellow flowers growing in our garden?
It is quite rare, and could possibly be confused with other shrubs that share its bright yellow pea like flowers. 
If you know the plants name together with the area that it originates from, please tell me in comments. 'Comments moderation' will be switched on to enable me to hold back anyone giving the right answers. This will then give everyone an equal chance. The answers will be given on Monday 18th May along with those who answered both parts correctly. 

37 comments:

  1. I think that's Evergreen Laburnum, apparently otherwise known as piptanthus nepalensis and it comes from the Himalayas. I've seen it and photographed it somewhere but can't find the picture.

    ReplyDelete
  2. This is a hard one Rosemary! I'm thinking a tea olive, Osmanthus fragrans 'Conger Yellow' perhaps - only because the leaves/stems resemble my own tea olive, however I don't have yellow flowers. They originated in the Himalayas, through China, Japan ad other Asian countries etc.
    Very lovely whatever it might be - does it smell too?
    Mary x

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sadly it has no smell Mary, but it arrived in our garden via a similar location to your Osmanthus fragrans.

      Delete
  3. Dear Rosemary,
    It's a beautiful shrub. I like it's shiny leaves. But I have no idea what it is. Have not seen one like it. This is a difficult quiz, I think.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dear Gina - there are several plants that have flowers very similar to this shrub, but this plant has something particularly distinctive about it.

      Delete
  4. Hello Rosemary, I don't think that these grow wild in NE Ohio!
    --Jim

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello Jim - spot on - they don't grow wild here either!

      Delete
  5. I haven't a scooby! I love flowers, but I'm rubbish at being able to name many of them :/ I had a flick through my Gardener's World magazines, but didn't see anything resembling it. Look forward to finding out :) Best, Jane x

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks for taking the time to look anyway Jane - hope that you are continuing to look after yourself.

      Delete
  6. I have no idea but it's beautiful!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It wouldn't survive a Canadian Winter Debra.

      Delete
  7. I don't know what it is but the larger leaves look a bit like a loquat but then I see they come in threes (trifolate?). Interesting.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You are right it is not a loquat - I have a loquat tree growing in the garden but its flowers are a pale cream colour and its leaves are very large - the leaves on this plant are as you say in threes and small.

      Delete
  8. So far I have drawn a blank, but I will continue to do a little research. If I come up with an answer I will post it. I will look forward in any event of knowing what it is.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Google is very good at finding the answer - look forward to hearing from you again David.

      Delete
  9. It's not a flower I recognize at all, but the yellow blooms have a bit of snap dragon look. I'll be curious to find out!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The flowers belong to the legume family and they have pods latter on after flowering.

      Delete
  10. I thought I had commented but got called away and am not sure so apologies if this is a repeat. I have no idea but the larger leaves reminded me of the Loquat tree but then I noticed that they are trifolate. Will be interested to discover what it is.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sorry about that Susan, I have switched on Comments Moderation in order to give everyone the same chance.

      Delete
  11. Dearest Rosemary,
    Well, it sure is a precious looking one. Flowers looking like the Broom but the leaves are so different and unique.
    Guess it has to be the Piptanthus nepalensis, or Nepal laburnum evergreen laburnum.
    Love its leaves and of course its flowers! Any babies?...
    Hugs,
    Mariette

    ReplyDelete
  12. Looks a lovely plants and know the name of it..
    Take care.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Hi rosemary!!!
    No idea...but it sure is pretty!!💛

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Linda - hope you are all well, and that the weather is getting warmer for you. It is hard for us all at this strange moment in our history, and I suspect that, you like me, must be missing seeing your grandchildren.

      Delete
  14. I have no idea why I'm thinking Himalayan sweet pea, or a type of orchid.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The location is right, but the flowers are not Polly.

      Delete
  15. I I guess..it would only be a guess...just wanted to say hello, and see your beautiful pictures. Janey

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That is so generous and kind of you Janey - thank you, you have made my day💕

      Delete
  16. I do not look at the answers above - and I am puzzled (which with plants in general I am not).
    Looks a bit like laburnum to me -- but as I say: I am not sure.
    No - cannot be -- they would hang down, and have different leaves.
    So: maybe Piptanthus nepalensis? (= P. laburnifolius)?
    Or Colutea arborescens (Bladder senna), Coronilla valentina...
    If I have only one guess, I would say: Pipanthus.

    ReplyDelete
  17. Looks like “Enishida” in Japanese. Science name is Cytisus scoparius, English name Scotch broom.

    Yoko

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You are right Yoko - it does bear a resemblance to broom, but it is not. Their flowers are, however, from the same family.

      Delete

❖PLEASE NOTE❖ Comments made by those who hide their identity will be deleted

“You can't stay in your corner of the forest waiting for others to come to you - you have to go to them sometimes”
― A.A. Milne, Winnie-the-Pooh