Tuesday, 8 November 2011

Gregynog Hall, Mid-Wales


 via Wikipedia
via Wikipedia
We have stayed many times at Gregynog Hall, Mid-Wales over the past 20 years.  It was left by the art collector owners, Margaret and Gwendoline Davies, to the University of Wales.
At the start of the twentieth century the sisters were the two richest unwed women in the British Isles with a combined personal fortune of £1,000,000 and an annual income of £40,000 inherited from their grandfather, David Davies of Llandinam. He was a self-made man whose fortune was derived from coal-owning, railways and the docks.
The current hall was built in the 1840s by Charles Hanbury-Tracy, lst Baron Sudeley, and believe it or not is one of the earliest examples of a concrete clad building still in existence. Only when you are within touching distance of the building do you realise it is not a wooden tudor house.
Margaret and Gwendoline were avid collectors of paintings, sculpture, and books. They were also great lovers of music, and  the house has a large music room which now holds the Gregynog Music Festival founded by the sisters in 1933. The Courtyard is home to the internationally recognised Gwasg Gregynog, a private printing press founded by the sisters, and which is still producing limited edition and very collectable hand-bound books.
When we first began staying there, the house was full of treasures, which have now been removed to the National Gallery of Wales, Cardiff, for their own safety.
The sisters began buying art in 1907 and concentrated initially on pre-Impressionist paintings. They bought a number of Carot's  exquisitely feathery landscapes.  They purchased works by Millet,  Daumier and Turner.  They then turned their attention to Impressionist and Post-Impressionist art.  They bought three of Monet's water-lily paintings, and also one of his most atmospheric depictions of Rouen cathedral, Rouen Cathedral: Setting Sun. The two most famous works they purchased were La Parisienne by Pierre-Auguste Renoir and a version of Rodin's Kiss cast in bronze, both of which were still in the house when we first visited.
La Parisienne by Renoir
 via Wikipedia

As you walk down the long dark tree lined drive towards the property, the vista suddenly opens up to reveal the black and white house, offset by the yellow castelatted yew hedge in the ha-ha, and being mid-Wales, the emerald green lawns - the setting is pure magic.
courtesy tregynoncommunitycouncil
This linocut of Gregynog Hall was printed at Gwasg Gregynog (the private press).  It is from a linocut by Peter Allen, with a quote from William Morris around the edge. 
Apologies for the poor reproduction, but I had difficulty scanning it. I did not want to remove the frame.

If I were asked to say what is at once the most important production of Art and the thing most to be longed for,
I should answer A BEAUTIFUL HOUSE and if I were further asked to name the production next in importance and the next thing to be longed for, I should answer A BEAUTIFUL BOOK.  To enjoy good houses and good books in self respect and decent comfort seems to me to be the pleasurable end towards which all societies of human beings ought now to struggle - William Morris.

16 comments:

  1. Hello Rosemary:
    We know of Gregynog Hall, such an imposing and interesting house, as a friend of ours worked for many years as a book binder there. The private printing press is, as you say, most intriguing, handling the most magnificent of volumes. It has been amazing to be reminded of all this by your wonderful post.

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  2. Beautiful images, that perfect green is amazing!

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  3. A great post, a wonderful place and some very beautiful pictures. Well done!

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  4. It is interesting Jane & Lance that your friend worked as a book binder at Gwasg Gregynog. As you know, many of the books are extremely valuable, being limited edition, and all made by hand. When we visit we like to see the fine Victorian presses in action.

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  5. You are right Marius the grass is an amazing green. It always astonishes us when we see it again - it rains a lot in Wales!!!

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  6. Fotokarusellen - it is a beautiful place to visit.

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  7. Good old William Morris. You have to love him. What a stunning house and an eclectic collection, Rosemary. Fancy it being part concrete! Thanks for a lovely post.

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  8. Dear Kate - I think that William Morris, much as we love him, was out of touch with the realities of his time. He had a utopian dream. Concrete used properly can be attractive, the Pantheon in Rome is concrete too.

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  9. ...busy writing down this lovely quote right now ; )

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  10. Dear Demie - William Morris's most famous quote is:-
    Have nothing in your house that you do not know to be useful, or believe to be beautiful.

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  11. Hello, Rosemary - I was not familiar with Gregynog Hall, but I can see why one would want to make return visits. Those yellow hedges against the bright greens are spectacular! I like Morris' useful/beautiful motto - words by which to live, and of course, the ground rule for spring cleaning!

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  12. Hello Mark - I believe that the golden/yellow yew topiary is quite unique. I have never seen it cut like that before. It extends to about 100 metres and makes an impressive impact.

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  13. Rosemary, I've just come to read this after your reply to my comment on your latest post. I too know Gregynog well and you have given such a good portrait of it and its fascinating history and past inhabitants.

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    1. I am pleased that you enjoyed it Perpetua. I have just reread it myself having not looked at it since last November. It is strange when you look at old posts, it is almost as if they have been written by someone else!!!

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  14. What a gorgeous house, Rosemary. And what a gorgeous painting by Renoir. I love it. That blue, that blue. Well, you already know I've fallen under the spell of that blue. Imagine buying these paintings in the beginning when the Impressionists were just getting known. What a dream.

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    1. Glad you enjoyed seeing it Yvette - it puts some meat on the bones when you know more about the life of a painting.

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