Sunday, 27 September 2015

Chatsworth Garden

Although nearing the end of September these wildflowers were still making a colourful show
The lst Duke's charming Greenhouse was built in 1697 to grow citrus trees. It is one of the most important C17th greenhouses surviving in England. Today it houses part of Chatsworth's Camellia collection, a few citrus trees and other tender plants
The Ipomoea 'Heavenly Blue' morning glories thriving happily in one of the other estate greenhouses
Ipomoea - 'Ocean Blue'
Henry Moore OM, CH - Three piece reclining figure: Draped
Every year Chatsworth hosts a large sculpture exhibition
The current one is entitled Beyond Limits: The Landscape of British Sculpture 1950-2015
The Long Walk, topped by a memorial urn to Blanche, wife of the 7th Duke
In a vale lying alongside but below the Long Walk is the Emperor Fountain - anticipating a visit from Tsar Nicholas l of Russia, the 6th Duke decided to construct the world's highest fountain, and set Joseph Paxton to work building it in 1843
Mr Paxton was Head Gardener to the 6th Duke, but he is far better known for his design and building of the Crystal Palace in Hyde Park where the Great Exhibition was held in 1851
Coloured lithograph of Queen Victoria opening the Great Exhibition
Paxton's unique building and design expertise in the use of cast-iron and glass was honed in the gardens at Chatsworth where in 1837 he built this revolutionary glass house which sadly was demolished in 1920
Paxton also designed a glass Lily House at Chatsworth - this illustration shows his daughter Annie standing on the leaf of a giant Victoria amazonica at Chatsworth - Paxton's design for the Crystal Palace took its cue from the organic structure of this plant 

beyond the Emperor fountain are uninterrupted views stretching across and beyond the River Derwent 
Juxtaposition
Classical statuary and the roofline at Chatsworth House appear dwarfed by a large scale sculptural construction by Conrad Shawcross RA called 'The Dappled Light of the Sun'
A sculptural piece by Stephen Cox RA - Dreadnought: Problems of History - The search for the hidden stone.
Personally I would have preferred to see the water cascade without the sculpture sitting in it, albeit only a temporary exhibit
A colourful show of wild flowers highlighting what is known as 'The Conservative Wall' - a series of greenhouses built in front of the garden wall. The building behind the wall is the imposing Stable Block
As the afternoon shadows lengthen - a last look over my shoulder, 
before heading back into the Derbyshire countryside

43 comments:

  1. I love the blue of a Morning Glory, and these look so pretty. Unfortunately, they are regarded as a pest here, and we are not supposed to grow them. They like our warm moist climate a bit too much and tend to overgrow everything and are not good for bushland either, where they sometimes take root. The sculpture show sounds interesting, and the Shawcross work does look huge, very industrial and quite a contrast to the elegant lines of the classical statue. The wildflowers are incredibly pretty, and do I even see red poppies in there? Another interesting post thank you Rosemary.

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    1. Dear Patricia - I know that Morning Glories are also banned in the States as well, but there is no fear of them becoming rampant here, I am just delighted when the seeds I sow outside grow and flourish for me. We do have two members of the Convolvulus family that grow here which are very unwelcome too for the same reasons as you mention.
      Yes, you are right that is a red poppy still flowering very late into the year.

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  2. Lovely garden, sad the greenhouse had demolished, not many of them have survived the ages.The fountain is beautiful.

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    1. It is a shame that one was demolished - it must be a regret, and I know that given the same situation today it would have been fully restored.

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  3. Dear Rosemary, Fabulous post and fantastic photography. You know how to tell a story through pictures. Only yesterday I was watching Pride and Prejudice for the umptiest time. If I was given only one choice to see one of the great English country houses it would be Chatsworth.

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    1. Dear Gina - it is thought that Jane Austen actually based her ideas of Pemberley on Chatsworth House as she wrote the novel whilst living in Bakewell which is literally a few miles away - her description fits Chatsworth perfectly - "It was a large, handsome, stone building standing well on rising ground, and backed by a ridge of high woody hills; and in front a stream of some natural importance was swelled into greater, but without any artificial appearance. Its banks were neither formal, nor falsely adorned."

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  4. Like the castle, impressive garden.

    Greetings,
    Filip

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    1. Pleased that you enjoyed seeing them both

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  5. What a great spot for a sculpture exhibition!

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  6. Wonderful green lawns...very lovely indeed....

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    1. The garden was still looking very summery

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  7. Dear Rosemary,

    One of my favorite stories about the Crystal Palace is that after the great exposition started, a sparrow or two got trapped inside, causing worry that some of the displays might get marred. So Victoria and Albert turned to the Duke of Wellington for a solution, and he did indeed have one. He set loose a sparrow hawk in the hall, and, voila, that was the end of the sparrow population.

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    1. Dear Mark - Paxton consulted with Isambard Kingdom Brunel and Robert Stephenson who could not come up with a solution, but as you mention it was Queen Victoria who said 'Send for the Duke' - it is said to be Wellingtons final victory.

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  8. I'm not much into stately manors or great houses, but I do love gardens. Minus the modern sculpture please.

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    1. The sculpture will be gone by the end of October

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  9. This garden is still on my wishlist to visit, that 'conservatory wall' is so special. The wild flowers are so pretty at this time of year.

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    1. It is on many peoples wish list so best to visit out of season and not at the weekend

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  10. Lovely photos. It looks like you had the place to yourself - how did you manage that!

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    1. Yes, it is difficult to get photos with no one around, patience they say is a virtue.

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  11. Hello Rosemary, I like some of the modern sculpture as a temporary exhibit, but Chatsworth is so classically elegant that these pieces permanently installed could seem intrusive.
    --Jim

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    1. Hello Jim - Most of the sculpture was huge and very heavy it must have been a major undertaking placing it in the grounds without causing damage. They will all be removed by the end of October

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  12. Dear Rosemary,

    It's beautiful to see how you captured Chatsworth on camera. It looks like you had much better weather than we had! Lucky you!

    Have a good week!

    Madelief x

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    1. Dear Madelief - The Gods shone down upon us. In the morning as we went around the house it was very wet, and still raining when we emerged at the other end. We ate our picnic in the car whilst it was still raining, and then suddenly the rain stopped, the skies turned brilliant blue and the sun shone.

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  13. A wonderful place to be spending the day, so much history...and the weather seemed to be just right :-)

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    1. It rained whilst we were in the house, but cleared up for the garden, so we were lucky

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  14. The wild flowers out in front of the conservative wall are so dainty and colorful. Wonderful post. janey

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    1. The wild flowers were surprisingly still doing well so late in the season

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  15. Hello again, Rosemary! Same here, there are still colorful flowers of summer, despite unusually early visit of autumn in the middle of August. The garden is so beautiful. Blue is my favorite color and Heavenly Blue is perfectly lovely. Why the conservatory was demolished in less than 100 years? Maybe structural problem because of that unique, impressive form, or maybe not.

    Yoko

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    1. Hello Yoko - I am not too sure why the glass house was demolished, but suspect that it may have needed a lot of money spending on it. Sadly the Crystal Palace is no more either as it was destroyed in a fire.

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  16. Another place I really want to visit. Your photos appear to have captured it beautifully.

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    1. We were fortunate as it rained whilst going around the house in the morning, but the sun came out right on cue for us after lunch.

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  17. Oh just stunning! What a place...thank´s for sharing this with us Rosemary!
    Have a happy week, take care!
    Titti

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    1. Dear Titti - thank you so much for your kind comment

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  18. Those are fantastic images and I didn't know about the connection with Crystal palace. That fountain and water cascade are wonderful features. I'm not sure about the temporary sculpture exhibition it doesn't look to me as if it enhances this great setting. Sarah x

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    1. The fountain and water cascade were very innovative garden features at the time, and I think that they are still worthy elements in the garden today.

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  19. I've never visited Chatsworth - it always seemed too stiff and formal for me. But from what you show of the gardens, it seems that they've made real efforts to create variety and charm. Next time I am in the area, I'll go and see the gardens, although the idea of the house still intimidates me.

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    1. I think that I am rather biased regarding Chatsworth Jenny, it has always held such a strong memory for me right back to my childhood.

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  20. Just wonderful photos (the little flowers are so cute).
    Hugs

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    1. It was lovely to still be able to see these wildflowers at the end of September

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  21. When I think of Derbyshire I always think of Pemberley. I agree that there are not many more beautiful places on earth. Love that glorious view you posted in your photos. And what a spectacular house. Was it the one used in the Pride and Prejudice film with Colin Firth? Love that golden color stone. I'm not sure that such modern sculpture rests easily in such a location, but I'm probably wrong. I like modern artworks, but in this instance, the house and grounds upstages it all.

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    1. Dear Yvette - Chatsworth was used in the Pride and Predjudice film, but it is believed that Jane Austen actually based Pemberley on Chatsworth because she wrote the book whilst staying in Bakewell which is literally a stones throw away from Chatsworth.
      The sculpture will be gone by the end of this month, it was only a temporary display.

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  22. Sigh, so lovely, I'm sad your Chatsworth tour is over. I'm putting this on my "must see" list. I'm making myself a cup of tea and then am going to catch up on your posts!

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